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TB Notes Newsletter

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No. 2, 2013

COMMUNICATIONS, EDUCATION, AND BEHAVIORAL STUDIES BRANCH UPDATES

DTBE Staff Assist WHO in Training-of-Trainers Workshop

Wanda Walton, PhD, and Cheryl Tryon, MS, of DTBE’s Communications, Education, and Behavioral Studies Branch (CEBSB) assisted the World Health Organization (WHO) Stop TB Department in organizing and implementing a Training of Trainers workshop for the Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant TB (PMDT).

Wanda Walton, PhD, and Cheryl Tryon, MS, of DTBE’s Communications, Education, and Behavioral Studies Branch (CEBSB) assisted the World Health Organization (WHO) Stop TB Department in organizing and implementing a Training of Trainers workshop for the Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant TB (PMDT). The workshop was held in conjunction with the WHO Western Pacific Region Office (WPRO) in Manila, Philippines, from May 30 to June 7, 2013. The overall objective of the workshop was to create a pool of master trainers in the region who will be able to deliver high-quality training in their own countries for health care workers responsible for implementing services to diagnose and treat multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB.

The 17 participants included representatives of national TB programs, WHO country offices, and non-government organizations from the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Mongolia, and China who are active in providing TB-related training.

The training was based on MDR TB technical modules developed by WHO, using the CDC Teachback Methodology Curriculum to develop training skills for the participants. The 17 participants included representatives of national TB programs, WHO country offices, and non-government organizations from the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Mongolia, and China who are active in providing TB-related training. Each participant developed a country-specific human resource development plan for PMDT requirements in their own country, and each is expected to follow up with implementation of the plan after the workshop.

—Reported by Wanda Walton, PhD, and
Cheryl Tryon, MS

Div of TB Elimination

 

The Latent TB Infection (LTBI) Treatment Fact Sheet Series – in Spanish

Earlier this year, CDC created the Latent TB Infection (LTBI) Treatment Fact Sheet Series. Designed to complement the treatment counseling delivered by a provider, the series consists of fact sheets for each of the three CDC-recommended LTBI regimens. Each fact sheet provides patients with a written reminder of their treatment regimen schedule, expected side effects, symptoms indicative of a possible adverse event, actions to take if symptoms of a possible adverse event do occur, tips to help remain adherent to the medication, and instructions in the event a dose of medication is missed. Each fact sheet in the series can be personalized for a patient.

Since these medications have rare but potentially serious side effects, each fact sheet features a prominent red STOP sign. The Isoniazid and Rifampin factsheets include a message instructing the patient to stop treatment and contact the TB doctor or nurse if any problems develop. The instruction for symptoms on the Isoniazid and Rifapentine (3HP) fact sheet is to stop and contact the doctor or nurse without waiting for the next scheduled DOT or clinic encounter.

After receiving multiple requests to have the series translated into Spanish, we are happy to announce the Spanish versions are now available!

To access the three fact sheets on the CDC DTBE website, please visit the TB Publications and Products – Factsheet page, under the title “What You Need to Know About Your Medicine for Latent Tuberculosis (TB) Infection-Fact Sheet Series.”  www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/treatment.htm

In the upper right hand corner of the page, there is a box that will link you to the Spanish version of the page. Click your mouse over the words “Español (Spanish).”

You can also access the Spanish webpage directly. www.cdc.gov/tb/esp/publications/factsheets/treatment.htm

The link for each fact sheet is also provided below.

Isoniazid Specific Regimen
English - www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/PDF/INH_508.pdf
Spanish - www.cdc.gov/tb/esp/publications/factsheets/Isoniazida.pdf

Rifampin Specific Regimen
English - www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/PDF/RIF_508.pdf
Spanish - www.cdc.gov/tb/esp/publications/factsheets/Rifampicina.pdf

Isoniazid and Rifapentine Specific Regimen
English - www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/PDF/3HP_508.pdf
Spanish - www.cdc.gov/tb/esp/publications/factsheets/Isoniazida_Rifapentina.pdf

The English and Spanish versions of the factsheets are also available as Word Documents upon request.

Please contact Joan Mangan at bpy4@cdc.gov for any comments or more information.

—Submitted by Joan Mangan, PhD, MST,
Kimberley N Chapman, MPH, CHES, and
Gloria Oramasionwu, MD, MPH
Div of TB Elimination

 

Update on TB Personal Stories Project

In the last issue of TB Notes, the TB Personal Stories project was described. This project supports the goal of raising awareness about TB in the United States. Specific objectives include communicating the following key points:

  • TB still exists and it poses serious health consequences if not controlled,
  • Real people still get TB every day and have been helped with treatment, and
  • Most importantly, public health provides the critical support that TB patients need in order to be diagnosed and cured of TB.

By the time of the 2013 World TB Day observance, the project had produced the following results:

  • Eight TB personal stories were posted to the TB website.
  • The TB story of one patient, Kenni, was posted as a CDC.gov feature the week of March 18.
  • On March 22, a pilot video montage in which three former TB or LTBI patients told their stories debuted at CDC’s World TB Day observance.

 

We are pleased to report that the original pilot video montage has been edited based on audience feedback. In addition, the individual stories of the TB or LTBI patients have been made into three short, stand-alone videos. When finalized, these videos will be available on the DTBE TB Personal Stories web page: http://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/basics/personalstories.htm. Please check back periodically on their status; we will also announce when they are available. When posted, we hope you will take a look at the interesting stories of these three individuals as they share their TB experiences and what they want others to know about TB.

The videotape of the entire March 22, 2013, World TB Day observance has been posted to the DTBE website. Please go to the DTBE World TB Day web page at http://wwwlink.cdc.gov/tb/events/WorldTBDay/observance.htm to watch the video.

If you know of a former or current TB patient who you think would be good for this project, please ask him or her to contact Nicole Richardson-Smith at ewo0@cdc.gov or Ann Lanner at lah1@cdc.gov. The ideal candidate would be an adult (18 or over) patient who was successfully detected, treated, and cured of TB, and who would be-

  • Willing to appear in a print or video story that could be seen by many people,
  • A good candidate for videotaping – is articulate and has a compelling story to tell,
  • Willing and able to travel to Atlanta, if possible, to be videotaped. Please note that a print story and photo for the web would not require travel.

—Reported by Ann Lanner and
Nicole Richardson-Smith, MA
Div of TB Elimination

 

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