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Recovering From Stroke

A woman using crutches to walk with the aid of a nurse.

Recovering from a stroke can take weeks, months, or even years.

Recovery time after a stroke varies—it can take weeks, months, or even years. Some people recover fully, but others have long-term or lifelong disabilities.

If you have had a stroke, you can make great progress in regaining your independence. However, some problems may continue:

  • Paralysis (inability to move some parts of the body), weakness, or both on one side of the body.
  • Trouble with thinking, awareness, attention, learning, judgment, and memory.
  • Problems understanding or forming speech.
  • Trouble controlling or expressing emotions.
  • Numbness or strange sensations.
  • Pain in the hands and feet that worsens with movement and temperature changes.
  • Trouble with chewing and swallowing.
  • Problems with bladder and bowel control.
  • Depression.

Before you are discharged from the hospital, social workers can help you find care services and caregiver support to continue your long-term recovery. It is important to work with your health care team to find out the reasons for your stroke and take steps to prevent another stroke.

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