Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Recall & Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers

Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Poona Infections Linked to Imported Cucumbers (Final Update)

Posted March 18, 2016 2:30 PM ET

This outbreak appears to be over. However, Salmonella remains an important cause of human illness in the United States. For more information about Salmonella and steps that people can take to reduce their risk of infection, visit CDC's Salmonella webpage.

Recalls

On September 11, 2015, Custom Produce Sales voluntarily recalled all cucumbers sold under the Fat Boy label starting August 1, 2015 because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. Unlabeled cucumbers packed into a black reusable plastic container, and sold in Nevada since August 1, 2015, are also covered by this recall. These cucumbers were sent to Custom Produce Sales from Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce.

The type of cucumber is often referred to as a “slicer” or “American” cucumber. It is dark green in color and typical length is 7 to 10 inches. In retail locations it is typically sold in a bulk display without any individual packaging or plastic wrapping.

These cucumbers are shipped in a black, green, and red cardboard box which reads “Fat Boy Fresh Produce.” Recalled cucumbers were produced in Baja California, Mexico and distributed in the states of California, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Texas.

On September 4, 2015, Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce voluntarily recalled all cucumbers sold under the “Limited Edition” brand label during the period from August 1, 2015 through September 3, 2015 because they may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The type of cucumber is often referred to as a “slicer” or “American” cucumber. It is dark green in color and typical length is 7 to 10 inches. In retail locations it is typically sold in a bulk display without any individual packaging or plastic wrapping.

Limited Edition cucumbers were distributed in the states of Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah and reached customers through retail, food service companies, wholesalers, and brokers. Further distribution to other states may have occurred.

These cucumbers are shipped in a green-and-black cardboard box with the label “Limited Edition Pole Grown Cucumbers.” Labeling on the cases of recalled cucumbers indicates the product was grown and packed by Rancho Don Juanito in Mexico. Domestically produced cucumbers are not believed to be involved in this outbreak.

Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers

Consumers who have purchased any recalled fruits and vegetables should do the following:

  • Throw the recalled product away, even if some of it has been eaten and no one has gotten sick.
  • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where recalled products were stored.
  • Wash reusable grocery bags often. Cloth bags should be washed in a washing machine, and plastic-lined bags should be scrubbed using hot water and soap.

Restaurants and retailers who have purchased any recalled fruits and vegetables should do the following:

  • Do not serve or sell the recalled product.
  • Wash and sanitize any crates or other containers where the recalled product was held or sold.
  • Wash any surfaces where recalled product may have come into contact, such as refrigerator drawers, counter tops, cutting boards, storage containers, and utensils, with an appropriate and effective cleaning solution.
  • Sanitize the surfaces with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water or another appropriate sanitizer, following the instructions provided on the label.

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should always follow safe fruit and vegetable handling recommendations:

  • Wash
    • Wash hands with soap and warm water before and after handling or preparing fruits and vegetables.
    • Wash cutting boards, dishes, utensils, and counter tops with soap and hot water between the preparation of raw meat, poultry and seafood products and the preparation of fruits and vegetables that will not be cooked.
  • Prepare
    • Wash all fruits and vegetables thoroughly under running water before eating, cutting or cooking.
    • Fruits and vegetables that are labeled "prewashed" do not need to be washed again.
    • Scrub firm fruits and vegetables, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush.
    • Cut away any damaged or bruised areas on fruits and vegetables before preparing and eating.
  • Store
    • Refrigerate cut, peeled, or cooked fruits and vegetables as soon as possible, or within 2 hours.
    • Store fruits and vegetables away from raw meat, poultry, and seafood.

For more fruit and vegetable safety advice, visit FDA's Produce Safety webpage.

Top