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Prevention

In the United States, Q fever outbreaks have resulted mainly from occupational exposure involving veterinarians, meat processing plant workers, sheep and dairy workers, livestock farmers, and researchers at facilities housing sheep. Prevention and control efforts should be directed primarily toward these groups and environments.

The following measures should be used in the prevention and control of Q fever:

  • Educate the public on sources of infection.
  • Appropriately dispose of placenta, birth products, fetal membranes, and aborted fetuses at facilities housing sheep and goats.
  • Restrict access to barns and laboratories used in housing potentially infected animals.
  • Use only pasteurized milk and milk products.
  • Use appropriate procedures for bagging, autoclaving, and washing of laboratory clothing.
  • Vaccinate (where possible) individuals engaged in research with pregnant sheep or live C. burnetii.
  • Quarantine imported animals.
  • Ensure that holding facilities for sheep should be located away from populated areas. Animals should be routinely tested for antibodies to C. burnetii, and measures should be implemented to prevent airflow to other occupied areas.
  • Counsel persons at highest risk for developing chronic Q fever, especially persons with pre-existing cardiac valvular disease or individuals with vascular grafts.

A vaccine for Q fever has been developed and has successfully protected humans in occupational settings in Australia. However, this vaccine is not commercially available in the United States. Persons wishing to be vaccinated should first have a skin test to determine a history of previous exposure. Individuals who have previously been exposed to C. burnetii should not receive the vaccine because severe reactions, localized to the area of the injected vaccine, may occur. A vaccine for use in animals has also been developed, but it is not available in the United States.

Significance for Bioterrorism

Coxiella burnetii is a highly infectious agent that is rather resistant to heat and drying. It can become airborne and inhaled by humans. A single C. burnetii organism may cause disease in a susceptible person. This agent has a past history of being developed for use in biological warfare and is considered a potential terrorist threat.

 
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    Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch
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    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
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