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Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal
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Volume 7: No. 3, May 2010

BRIEF
Differences in the Prevalence and Severity of Arthritis Among Racial/Ethnic Groups in the United States, National Health Interview Survey, 2002, 2003, and 2006

Category Race/Ethnicity, Odds Ratio (95% CI)a
Non-Hispanic White Non-Hispanic Black Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native Asian/Pacific Islander Multiracial or “Other”b
Arthritis prevalencec 1 [Reference] 0.83 (0.78-0.89) 0.54 (0.50-0.58) 1.42 (1.07-1.88) 0.42 (0.35-0.50) 1.00 (0.85-1.29)
Activity limitationd 1 [Reference] 1.33 (1.20-1.46) 1.31 (1.14-1.51) 1.10 (0.70-1.71) 1.21 (0.89-1.64) 1.66 (1.21-2.27)
Severe joint paine 1 [Reference] 1.87 (1.67-2.08 1.80 (1.57-2.05) 1.32 (0.91-1.90) 0.84 (0.57-1.25) 1.85 (1.34-2.55)
Work limitationf 1 [Reference] 1.65 (1.45-1.89) 1.59 (1.35-1.86) 1.33 (0.81-2.18) 1.04 (0.64-1.69) 2.22 (1.51-3.26)

Abbreviation: CI, confidence interval.
a Odds ratios were adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index.
b Data for other and multiple race populations are combined. Respondents in this category were non-Hispanic.
c Answer of yes to the question, “Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?”
d Answer of yes to the question, “Are you now limited in any way in any of your usual activities because of arthritis or joint symptoms?”
e Rating of 7-10 on a scale assessing average pain in the last 30 days, with 0 being no pain and 10 being worst pain. (Approximately 28% of respondents with doctor-diagnosed arthritis did not report joint pain in the past 30 days and were not asked the question about pain severity. For this analysis, these respondents were classified as not having severe joint pain and were included in the denominator.)
f Among working-age respondents (18-64 years), answer of yes to the question, “Do arthritis or joint symptoms now affect whether you work, the type of work you do, or the amount of work you do?”

Figure. Odds of having arthritis and associated limitations, by race/ethnicity, National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2002, 2003, and 2006. Odds ratios were adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index.

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The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


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