Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice and Policy

View Current Issue
Issue Archive
Archivo de números en español








Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal
MMWR


 Home 

Volume 7: No. 3, May 2010

ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Racial/Ethnic Differences in Perceived Access, Environmental Barriers to Use, and Use of Community Parks

Activity Frequency of participation, % (95% Confidence Interval)
White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic Hispanic Othera
Walking/hiking 58 (55-60)b 45 (39-52) 53 (48-59) 53 (44-61)
Running/jogging 6 (5-7) 9 (6-13) 11 (8-15)c 12 (7-18)c
Swimming 9 (8-11) 8 (5-12) 12 (9-17)d 13 (9-20)d
Biking 9 (8-11) 10 (6-17) 12 (8-17) 15 (9-25)
Playing sports 14 (12-15) 14 (9-20) 21 (16-26) 23 (16-31)
Relaxing 51 (49-53) 55 (49-62) 53 (47-59) 51 (43-59)
Picnicking 33 (31-36) 33 (27-40) 36 (30-41) 33 (26-41)
Attending an outdoor event 31 (29-34) 33 (27-39) 30 (25-36) 33 (26-41)
Attending a gathering of family or friends 40 (37-42) 49 (42-56)e 45 (39-51) 45 (37-53)

Figure. Participation in various activities during the previous 12 months among adult park visitors by race/ethnicity, HealthStyles 2006 (n = 3,763). Respondents were asked to indicate which of the following 9 activities that they had participated in: walking/hiking, picnicking, relaxing, swimming, biking, running/jogging, attending an outdoor event, playing sports, and attending a gathering of family or friends. Respondents could select multiple activities; 175 respondents did not select any.
a “Other” race/ethnicity includes American Indian, Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islander.
b In a pairwise comparison (t test), prevalence was significantly higher than in non-Hispanic blacks (non-Hispanic whites, P = .001, df = 2,979).
c In a pairwise comparison (t test), prevalence was significantly higher than in non-Hispanic whites (Hispanics, P = .003, df = 3,069; “other” race/ethnicity, P = .04, df = 2,804).
d In a pairwise comparison (t test), prevalence was significantly higher than in non-Hispanic whites (Hispanics, P = .01, df = 3,069; “other” race/ethnicity, P = .02, df = 2,804).
e In a pairwise comparison (t test), prevalence was significantly higher than in non-Hispanic whites (non-Hispanic blacks, P = .01, df = 2,979).

Return to article

 




 



The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


 Home 

Privacy Policy | Accessibility

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed March 22, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
 HHS logoUnited States Department of
Health and Human Services