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Volume 5: No. 4, October 2008

ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Reproductive Health Surveillance in the US-Mexico Border Region, 2003-2006: The Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health

This flowchart consists of 4 boxes, which are arranged 1 on top of the other and read from top to bottom. Each box is connected to the box below it with a downward-pointing arrow. The first box says, “Target Population: All women who delivered live infants in Cameron County and Matamoros during the study period (August 21st-November 9th, 2005).” The second box says, “Study Population: Women who delivered live infants during the study period in Cameron County and Matamoros in hospitals with 100 or more deliveries in 2004 (4 hospitals in Cameron County and 6 hospitals in Matamoros).” The third box says, “Sampling: 84 blocks of 2 consecutive days selected during the study period (36 blocks in Cameron County [9 in each study hospital] and 48 blocks in Matamoros [8 in each study hospital]).” The fourth box says, “Women Chosen for the Study: All women who delivered live infants during each of the selected blocks of 2 consecutive days (n = 999) (sample size for Cameron County = 525; sample size for Matamoros = 474).”

Figure 2. Sampling Design of the Surveillance System Used for the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health, August 21-November 9, 2005.

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This flowchart depicts the flow of data during the pilot project. The flowchart consists of several boxes that are connected to one another with downward-, right-, and left-pointing arrows. The text in the boxes indicates how data were collected and input into the computer system. After the birth of the infant in the hospital, data were recorded on paper in the delivery log, which was then screened by interviewers (this part of the process took approximately 1 day). The interviewers created a respondent contact sheet and a sample key. The sample key was converted into a delivery log review form and was used to generate an identification number. Interviewers used the respondent contact sheet and the identification number when conducting interviews with patients. Interviewers collected data using laptop computers and analyzed the data with computer software (CSPro, 2.6, International Programs Center, US Census Bureau, Washington, District of Columbia) (this part of the process took <1 week). Data were transferred to field coordinators, then to United States-Mexico Border Health Association data managers, and finally to a statistician at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (this part of the process took <1 week). The CDC statistician created a report that summarized the data, and this report was provided to stakeholders (this part of the process took <2 weeks).

Figure 3. Data Flow in the Brownsville-Matamoros Sister City Project for Women’s Health, August 21-November 9, 2005.

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The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


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