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Volume 4: No. 2, April 2007

ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Health Behaviors of the Young Adult U.S. Population: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2003

This model depicts the flow of questions in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) 2003 weight control module. The model reads from top to bottom and features a series of questions contained in boxes. Each box contains one question and has two lines leading to answer choices (yes or no), which in turn lead the reader to one of two consecutive boxes. There are five total boxes in the module.

The first box contains the question, “Are you now trying to lose weight?” The first of two lines leading outward from this box connects to a triangle on the left containing the word no. The second of the two lines leading outward from this box connects to a triangle on the right containing the word yes. The negative response triangle leads the reader to a second box on the left, containing the question, “Are you now trying to maintain your current weight, that is to keep from gaining weight?” The affirmative response triangle leads the reader to a third box on the right, containing the question, “Are you eating fewer calories or less fat to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight?”

From the second box on the left (“Are you now trying to maintain your current weight, that is to keep from gaining weight?”), the first of two lines leading outward connects to a triangle on the left containing the word no. The second of two lines leading outward from this second box connects to a triangle on the right containing the word yes. The negative response triangle leads the reader to a box at the bottom of the module, containing the final question, “In the past 12 months, has a doctor, nurse, or other health professional given you advice about your weight?” The affirmative response triangle leads the reader back to the third box, containing the question, “Are you eating fewer calories or less fat to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight?”

This third box in the module (“Are you eating fewer calories or less fat to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight?”) has two lines leading directly below it, one connecting to a triangle on the left containing the word no and the other connecting to a triangle on the right containing the word yes. Both negative and affirmative responses to the question contained in this box lead to a fourth box, containing the question, “Are you using physical activity or exercise to lose weight or keep from gaining weight?”

The fourth box has two lines leading directly below it, one connecting to a triangle on the left containing the word no and the other connecting to a triangle on the right containing the word yes. Both negative and affirmative responses to the question contained in the fourth box (“Are you using physical activity or exercise to lose weight or keep from gaining weight?”) lead to the fifth and final box in the module, containing the question, “In the past 12 months, has a doctor, nurse, or other health professional given you advice about your weight?” This question completes the module.

Figure. Flow of questions in the weight control module, BRFSS, 2003.

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