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Volume 4: No. 2, April 2007

COMMUNITY CASE STUDY
From Heart Health Promotion to Chronic Disease Prevention: Contributions of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative 

This figure is a graphic cube that depicts the phases of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative from 1986 to 2003 and beyond. The cube has three visible sides, and each displays different information.

The top of the cube displays a timeline of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative phases listed from top to bottom and the years listed from left to right across the bottom. The duration of each phase is represented by an arrow. The first phase is “Policy development” which begins in 1986 and ends shortly after 1990. Next, there is the “Heart Health Surveys” phase that begins in 1986 and ends in 1992. The “Demonstration” phase is next, and it begins shortly after 1988 and ends in 1996. Following is the “Evaluation” phase which begins in 1992 and ends shortly after 1998. Last, is the “Dissemination” phase which begins in 1995 and continues beyond 2003. Also, from 1998 to 2003 and beyond, there is a section with text that reads “Deploy capacity.”

The front face of the cube lists objectives for different time periods. The objectives listed from 1986 to 1998 include “build capacity,” “develop research and implementation platform,” and “forge intersectoral partnership.” The objectives listed from 1998 to 2003 and beyond include “expand partnerships” and “use knowledge capital.”

The right face of the cube has text that reads “Toward a Healthy Canada.” All of the arrows on the top face are pointing in the direction of the text on the right face.

Figure 1. Phases of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative, 1986 to 2005.

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This figure is a map that depicts a profile of Canadian provinces participating in the Canadian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI) Dissemination Phase study from 1994 to 2004. In this figure, RHA stands for regional health authorities, PHU stands for public health units, and HP stands for health promotion. The map reads from left to right.

The first province has a word box with the title, “British Columbia,” and the following facts listed: “5 RHAs, provincial HP goals and framework, limited HP funding, study population 3.9 million.” The second province has a word box with the title, “Alberta,” and the following facts listed: “9 RHAs, recent HP goals, limited target HP funding, study population 3 million.” The third province has a word box with the title, “Saskatchewan,” and the following facts listed: “12 RHAs, recent HP mandate, very limited HP funding, study population 971, 300.” The next province has a word box with the title, “Manitoba,” and the following facts listed, “11 RHAs, loose HP mandate, modest HP funding, study population 21, 300.” The next province on the map has a word box with the title, “Ontario,” followed by these facts: “37 regional PHUs, specific HP mandate, joint HP funding, study population 11.9 million.” The next province has a word box with the title, “Prince Edward Island,” and the following facts are listed: “5 RHAs, general HP mandate, limited HP funding, study population 7800.” The final province on the map has a word box with the title, “Newfoundland and Labrador,” and the following facts listed: “6 regional health and community service boards, general HP mandate, modest HP funding, study population 518,900.”

Figure 2. Canadian provinces participating in Canadian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI) dissemination phase study, 1994–2005.
 
RHA indicates regional health authorities; PHU, public health units; HP, health promotion.
 
Health system structures and population size reflect information at the time of the study. Dates vary by province. (See Methods section.) New Brunswick did not participate in the dissemination phase study. Quebec and Nova Scotia did not participate in the current study.

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