Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice and Policy

View Current Issue
Issue Archive
Archivo de números en español








Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal
MMWR


 Home 

Volume 3: No. 2, April 2006

ORIGINAL RESEARCH
The Impact of Cancer Coalitions on the Dissemination of Colorectal Cancer Materials to Community Organizations in Rural Appalachia

Figure 1. Dissemination of Materials by Community Cancer Coalitions to Community Organizations, Northern Appalachia Cancer Network (NACN) Screen for Life (SFL) Pilot Study, 2003.

The figure is a flow chart explaining the participation and nonparticipation of organizations in the study, by cancer coalition arm or by noncoalition arm. Of the NACN cancer coalitions (on the left side of the flow chart), nine coalitions identified 75 community organizations in each of their counties (15 for each of 5 types) for SFL materials dissemination (n = 675). Fifty organizations (10 per each of 5 types) were selected in each county; coalitions delivered or mailed recruitment and SFL materials (n = 450). Of the 450, 160 returned the initial survey and consented to participate; 20 returned the initial survey and refused to participate but provided reasons for nonparticipation. Of the 160 that consented, all were contacted by the coalition midway through the study, and 130 of them completed the follow-up survey.

On the right side of the flow chart, of the NACN research team, noncoalition arm, the university-based investigators identified 75 community organizations in 9 matched counties (15 for each of 5 types) for SFL materials dissemination (n = 675). Fifty community organizations (10 per each of 5 types) were randomly selected in each county; investigators mailed recruitment and SFL materials (n = 450). Of the 450, 19 returned the initial survey and refused to participate but provided reasons for nonparticipation. Of the 450, 68 returned the initial survey and consented to participate (n = 68). Of the 68 that consented, 38 returned the follow-up survey.

Of the original 900 (450 in the coalition arm and 450 in the noncoalition arm), 551 were lost to follow up. Of the 900, 181 did not participate but provided reasons for nonparticipation, and 168 completed the intervention.

Return to article

 



 



The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors’ affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.


 Home 

Privacy Policy | Accessibility

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed March 22, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
 HHS logoUnited States Department of
Health and Human Services