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Diagnosis

Angiostrongylus cantonensis

Diagnosing A. cantonensis infections can be difficult, in part because there are no readily available blood tests. Important clues that could lead to the diagnosis of infection are a history of travel to where the parasite is known to be found and ingestion of raw or undercooked snails, slugs, or possibly transport hosts (such as frogs, fresh water shrimp or land crabs) in those areas. A high level of eosinophils, a blood cell that can be elevated in the presence of a parasite, in the blood or in the fluid that surrounds the brain can be another important clue. Persons worried that they might be infected should consult their health care provider.

Angiostrongylus costaricensis

Diagnosing A. costaricensis infections can be difficult, in part because there are no readily available blood tests. Important clues that could lead to the diagnosis of infection are a history of travel to where the parasite is known to be found and ingestion of raw or undercooked slugs or food contaminated by infected slugs or their slime. A high blood level of eosinophils, a blood cell that can be elevated in the presence of a parasite, can be another important clue. Persons worried that they might be infected should consult their health care provider.

 
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  • Page last reviewed: November 2, 2010
  • Page last updated: November 2, 2010
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