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Clinicians: CDC now has an investigational drug called miltefosine available for treatment of free-living ameba (FLA) infections caused by Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Acanthamoeba species. If you have a patient with suspected FLA infection, please contact the CDC Emergency Operations Center at 770-488-7100 to consult with a CDC expert regarding the use of this drug.

Early diagnosis is essential for effective treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Several prescription eye medications are available for treatment. However, the infection can be difficult to treat. The best treatment regimen for each patient should be determined by an eye doctor. If you suspect your eye may be infected with Acanthamoeba, see an eye doctor immediately.

Skin infections that are caused by Acanthamoeba but have not spread to the central nervous system can be successfully treated. Because this is a serious infection and the people affected typically have weakened immune systems, early diagnosis offers the best chance at cure.

Most cases of brain and spinal cord infection with Acanthamoeba (Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis) are fatal.

 

A square ad showing an infected eyeball with Acanthamoeba. The caption reads, "Delayed diagnosis means poorer outcomes - think Acanthamoeba keratitis."

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  • Page last reviewed: August 22, 2013
  • Page last updated: August 22, 2012
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