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Archived
June, 2007


Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Performance Report
for the Hispanic Agenda for Action (HAA) & the Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans Initiative (EEHA)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)

Report

1.  Overview

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to improve education opportunities for Hispanic Americans as evidenced by the following report.  Information on programs and activities that have a direct impact on the Hispanic/Latino community is provided in addition to information on the support provided to Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools (HSHPS).

CDCís Office of Minority Health (OMH) has been in the forefront of ensuring that the public health needs of Hispanic Americans continue to be addressed and coordinated CDCís support and participation in the 2002 Congressional Hispanic Caucusí National Hispanic Health Leadership Summit held in August 2002, in San Antonio, Texas. This Summit convened health care leaders and Congressional representatives and their staff to discuss critical health care issues and needs of the Hispanic/Latino communities.

CDC continues to monitor and promote the cooperative agreement with the Hispanic-Serving Health Professions Schools, Inc. (HSHPS) and the Interagency Agreement with Human Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), which supports three grassroots migrant farmworker stream forums, organized by the National Center on Farmworker Health (NCFWH).

The CDC Office of the Director (OD) Spanish website, CDC En EspaŮol, has continued to grow in both content and outreach to viewers. It continues to facilitate quality translation services for the Centers, Institute, and Offices (CIOs) and has established an intranet site for employees.

Highlights of CDCís programs and activities that serve the Latino/Hispanic communities include:

blue square CDCís National Institute for Occupational Safety and Healthís five Agriculture Research Centers that serve a significant Hispanic/Latino population and address the needs of women, children, and migrant/seasonal workers.
blue square CDCís translation and communication of information in Spanish through Spanish publications, an all-Spanish language website, a Spanish-language answering system for the NIOSH toll-free number, and a system for responding to e-mail requests in Spanish.
blue square CDCís ten Regional Training Centers for Family Planning that integrate HIV and other prevention services into ongoing reproductive services in areas that have a high concentration of Latinos:  Boston, Puerto Rico, the South Bronx, and along the Texas-Mexico border.
blue square CDCís Public Health Institute in Los Angeles, California, that focuses exclusively on Latina women and their primary male sex partners.
blue square CDCís formative research on issues related to breast and cervical cancer screening in rarely/never screened women including focus groups with Mexican women in Houston, Texas; Fresno, California; and San Diego, California.
blue square CDCís formative research, population survey, and intervention research to increase cervical cancer screening in Hispanic women, and design an educational intervention to be delivered by promotoras (community health workers) in the community.
blue square CDCís Central America Diabetes Initiative (CAMDI), which aims to reduce the burden of diabetes in the United States and improve access to care, education, and diabetes care in Central America (Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua).
blue square CDCís Diabetes Today National Training Center has provided training to a total of 565 individuals.  The English Version Training was completed by 347 individuals, and 218 have completed the Spanish Version Training.
blue square CDCís National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is a joint initiative with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that involves an extensive partnership network of more than 200 public and private organizations.  NDEP has reached 3.6 million Hispanics through public service announcements (PSAs) in media broadcasts and 24 million Hispanics via print media.
blue square In 2002, CDC selected The National Alliance for Hispanic Health (The Alliance) organization to implement community-based strategies for diabetes awareness, prevention, and treatment in Hispanic target communities.
blue square CDCís United States/Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project (US/MX BDPCP) is a collaborative effort developed to determine the prevalence of diabetes along the United States/Mexico border and to establish binational diabetes prevention and control programs that respond to the needs of the border population.
blue square CDCís Illinois Prevention Research Center has partnered with a Latino youth-serving organization, the Southwest Youth Collaborative, to conduct a community-based diabetes prevention and control program in two community areas on Chicago's southwest side.
blue square CDCís National Center for Infectious Diseasesí (NCID) United States/Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project provides a sentinel surveillance system for emerging infections and other communicable diseases of public health importance for this region.
blue square In 2002, CDC/NCID assisted in publishing proceedings from the First Puerto Rican Conference on Public Health organized by the University of Puerto Rico and collaborated with the Puerto Rico Health Department, the Childrenís Museum of San Juan, the Puerto Rico Department of Education and the Rotary Club of San Juan.
blue square CDC, through the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), contributed $10,000 to the National Hispanic Youth Initiative (NHYI) sponsored by the Interamerican College of Physicians and Surgeons, via a cooperative agreement with the Office of Minority Health at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
blue square In fiscal year (FY) 2002, CDC supported the training of 30 Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) students, four Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools (HSHPS) students, and two James Ferguson Fellows who were Latino.
blue square In 2002, CDC contracted with Harrison Maldonado Associates (HMA), a multi‑cultural advertising and marketing firm, to produce, distribute, and market immunization messages and media products to Spanish-speaking Hispanics via media outlets, health care providers, community leaders, and other culturally relevant venues.  A Spanish-language public service campaign with the theme, ďLa PromesaĒ (ďThe PromiseĒ), was developed and unveiled during National Infant Immunization Week at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
blue square CDC continued to fund the Spanish language Immunization Information Hotline and to translate, print, and distribute Parents Guide to Childhood Immunization.  The Parents Guide provides basic information about vaccine-preventable diseases and routine childhood immunizations to the general public.  In 2002, to date, there have been 10,848 calls to the CDC Spanish-language Immunization Information Hotline. Sixty-one percent of the calls were from parents and caregivers with questions related to childhood immunizations.  Thirty-one percent of the calls were on adult immunization questions, and three percent of the calls were from healthcare providers.
blue square CDC/NIP has a cooperative agreement with the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, which has implemented a program called Vacunas para la familia (Immunizations for All Ages), which promotes immunization to improve childhood, adolescent and adult immunization coverage in selected Hispanic communities for the purpose of eliminating racial/ethnic disparities.

 

2.  Detailed Description of Activities

At this time, CDC is not able to capture all the data required to complete the new federal reporting form for the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, Executive Order 13230, No Child Left Behind.  Now that CDC has received the new form, it will be in a better position to collect these data for future reporting in the format indicated by the new form.

CDCís mission is to promote health and quality of life by preventing and controlling disease, injury, and disability. CDC seeks to accomplish its mission by working with partners throughout the nation and world to monitor health, detect and investigate health problems, conduct research to enhance prevention, develop and advocate sound public health policies, implement prevention strategies, promote healthy behaviors, foster safe and healthful environments, and provide leadership and training. Since CDC works primarily through partners, it has worked diligently this past year to support and enhance its relationship with key organizations that are recognized champions of Hispanic/Latino higher education.

Below is a summary of some of the programs and activities directed specifically at Hispanic/Latino communities.

CDC, through its Centers, Institute, and Offices (CIOs), is investing in efforts to reach out to organizations that can promote their work with the Latino community.

The CDC Spanish website CDC En EspaŮol has continued to grow in both content and outreach to viewers.  CDC continues to facilitate quality translation services for the CIOs and has established an intranet site for employees.

Specifically in relationship to students, this past year, CDC, through its Human Resources Management Office, provided support for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) and was able to place 30 HACU students throughout its CIOs.  This is an unprecedented number at CDC.  CDC is looking at ways to expand the participation of HACU students at CDC and to further refine what it can offer these students.

CDCís Office of Minority Health (OMH)
In higher education, CDC/OMH has established a five-year cooperative agreement with the Hispanic-Serving Health Professions Schools, Inc., (HSHPS). This organization, headed by Dr. Elena Rios, CEO, is in the forefront of promoting research related to Latino health and in the development of Latino researchers. According to Dr. Rios, there are approximately 3,000 Hispanic faculty and approximately 4,000 Hispanic medical students in the United States.

Dr. Rios estimates that the HSHPS is able to reach approximately two thirds of this population. In FY 2002, as a result of the HSHPSí researcher database, CDC was able to integrate into its external review system newly identified researchers who have worked with the Latino community.  Although the preliminary numbers are small, it is CDCís intent to continue to develop this network of resources to enhance its outreach and penetration of this underserved population.

Through the CDC/HSHPS cooperative agreement, a United States/Mexico border research seminar series was initiated in December 2001.  Work on resultant data bases from this activity is still being completed.  In addition, four medical and public health HSHPS interns were placed at CDC through this cooperative agreement in FY 2002.

CDC/OMH, through an interagency agreement with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), continues to support three grassroots migrant farmworker stream forums, organized by the National Center on Farmworker Health.  This support has involved both funding and collaboration in panels, presentations, workshops, and research activities.  CDCís support for the forums includes funding, identifying subject matter experts for panel and workshop presentations, conducting research activities, and facilitating communication, which helps researchers, workers, employers, and advocates break down barriers and develop trust and cooperation.

CDC/OMH coordinated CDCís support and participation in the 2002 Congressional Hispanic Caucusí National Hispanic Health Leadership Summit.  The summit focused on health issues of all Hispanics in the United States and Puerto Rico.  It encompassed the areas of data and surveillance, research, public health infrastructure, multiple sector collaboration, United States/ Mexico border health, chronic diseases, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, TB, environmental health, asthma, neural tube birth defects, and violence and injury.  In addition to developing a new bilingual/bicultural table top display (bilingual information on CDC programs of particular interest to Hispanics), CDCís National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) also provided a data package:  ďA Demographic and Health Snapshot of the U.S. Hispanic/Latino Populations.Ē

CDCís National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
CDCís National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health  focuses efforts on Hispanic-American workers represented in those occupations and industries, such as agriculture, construction, and manufacturing, where priority health and safety risks are being addressed, and also on preventing exposures to high priority hazards such as silica and lead. NIOSHís agricultural safety and health program addresses one of the most dangerous industries second to miningĖagriculture, and includes a number of activities targeting immigrant and Hispanic populations. NIOSHís research helps reduce ergonomic problems for workers in the wine-grape industry.  With extramural partners, Hispanic health care workers are utilized to reduce injuries and illnesses in Latino farmworkers. Furthermore, five of CDCís 10 Agriculture Research Centers (ARC) are located in areas that have a significant Hispanic/Latino population addressing the needs of women, children, and migrant/seasonal workers.

CDC, through NIOSH, targets efforts to reduce illness and injury among Hispanic workers by translating and communicating information into Spanish through Spanish publications, an all-Spanish language website, a Spanish-language answering system for the NIOSH toll-free number, and a system for responding to e-mail requests in Spanish.

CDCís National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP)
CDCís 10 cooperative agreements with the Regional Training Centers for Family Planning support training for reproductive health providers in the integration of HIV and other prevention services into ongoing reproductive health services.  Approximately 50 percent of the training of trainers, 63 percent of on-site training, and 22 percent of basic training is provided to minority populations, although the specific breakdown of these groups is not available.  Examples of areas where these centers are established that have high concentration of Latinos are Boston, Puerto Rico, the South Bronx, and along the Texas-Mexico border.

CDC provides funding to the Public Health Institute in Los Angeles, California, and the University of Oklahoma Health Services Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to develop, implement, and evaluate a theory-based intervention to prevent unintended pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among 18-25 year-old women.  The Los Angeles site focuses exclusively on Latina women and their primary male sex partners.  Based on formative research findings, the investigators developed a theory-based intervention consisting of three small group sessions to help women and their partners recognize personal susceptibility; increase motivation to change behavior; improve communication about safer sex among couples; and acquire necessary skills to prevent unintended pregnancy, HIV, and other STDs.

CDC is doing formative research on issues related to breast and cervical cancer screening in rarely or never screened women. This includes a comprehensive literature review examining barriers to breast and cervical cancer screening among racial/ethnic minorities, not limited to Mexican women, and the conduct of focus groups with Mexican women.  Twenty-four focus groups were conducted with a total of 183 Mexican women.  Eight focus groups were conducted in each of three locations:  Houston, Texas; Fresno, California; and San Diego, California.  Women between the ages of 40-69 participated in the groups and all groups were conducted in Spanish.  Analysis of the focus group data is underway.

CDC is also conducting formative research, population surveys, and intervention research in the area of increasing cervical cancer screening in Hispanic women.  Focus groups were used to identify reasons why women do not get Papanicolaou (Pap) tests.  A population survey was used to describe the population and correlates of screening.  The information from the formative research and the population survey were used to design an educational intervention to be delivered by promotoras in the community.

CDC, through the Central America Diabetes Initiative (CAMDI), aims to reduce the burden of diabetes in the United States and contribute to international efforts to reduce the burden in other countries around the world.  Aside from the impact on the countries of Central America, this project is relevant to the large and growing Hispanic-America population, of whom many have emigrated from Central America. Long-term goals of the project include an intervention phase, which is to improve access to care, education, and diabetes care in Central America (Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua).

CDCís Diabetes Today National Training Center is designed to provide training, technical assistance, and follow-up in community-based planning, implementation, and evaluation around diabetes control and prevention, primarily to state health departments and their partners.  Participants in this project include state level health professionals, community leaders, members of National Minority Organizations (NMO), members of volunteer organizations, and health care providers who are interested in addressing the problem of diabetes.  This training is available for both English and Spanish speaking populations.  The Diabetes Today National Training Center is currently in its third year of funding.  During the period October 1, 1999 - September 30, 2002, a total of 565 individuals completed Diabetes Today training.  The English Version Training was completed by 347 individuals, and 218 individuals have completed the Spanish Version Training.  Eighteen training sessions have been conducted in English, and seven training sessions have been conducted in Spanish.  These training sessions were conducted by community representatives who were trained in how to conduct community-based diabetes control/intervention programs.

CDCís National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is a joint initiative with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that involves an extensive partnership network of more than 200 public and private organizations.  The mission of the NDEP is to improve treatment and outcomes for people with diabetes by changing the way diabetes is treated, promote early diagnosis and, ultimately, to prevent the onset of this disease. NDEPís key activities are to build the NDEP Partnership Network at the national, state, and community level; initiate program evaluation activities to collect, analyze, and measure NDEPís impact on target audiences and outcomes related to diabetes care; and facilitate the implementation and continued development of project objectives and strategies that fit into its overall strategic plan.  The target population is persons with diabetes; a special emphasis is placed on reaching racial and ethnic minorities including Hispanics.  NDEP has reached 3.6 million Hispanics through public service announcements (PSAs) in media broadcasts and 24 million Hispanics via print media.

In 2002, CDC selected six national minority organizations to support National Diabetes Education Program activities that strengthen the capacity of national and regional minority organizations to reduce the disproportionate burden of diabetes among high-risk populations (e.g., black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native).  One national Hispanic organization was awarded funds to support National Diabetes Education Program activities.  This is the National Alliance for Hispanic Health.  The National Alliance for Hispanic Health is currently in the process of implementing community-based strategies for diabetes awareness, prevention, and treatment in four target communities.  In addition, this organization plans to strengthen the capacity of health care providers to conduct effective diabetes education by providing training that combines cultural and linguistic proficiency with formal diabetes education for Hispanics.

CDCís Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) study is a multi-center prospective cohort study.  It includes baseline and 18-month follow-up data collection from health plans, provider groups, and diabetic patients.  The fundamental hypothesis of the TRIAD study is that structural and organizational characteristics of health systems and health care provider groups affect the processes and quality of care that influence health and economic outcomes.  More specifically, the TRIAD study hypothesizes that greater experience with managed care; less use of clinician incentives to limit referrals and care; more intense efforts to implement accepted practice guidelines; and the presence of systems to identify, risk stratify, and manage patients will be associated with better processes and outcomes of care.

CDCís United States/Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project (US/MX BDPCP)
(US/MX BDPCP) is the result of a collaborative effort among CDC; the Mexico Health Ministry; the Office of International and Refugee Health; the Pan American Health Organization (through their field office in El Paso, Texas); the State Diabetes Control Programs (DCPs) and Border Health Offices; Community Based Organizations (CBOs), and El Paso del Norte, Texas, and California foundations.  In addition to the funding from CDC, considerable financial support for this project is received from the El Paso del Norte Foundation, the California Endowment Foundation, and Stateís DPCP Programs. This five-year United States/Mexico collaborative project attempts to determine the prevalence of diabetes along the United States/Mexico border and to develop binational diabetes prevention and control programs that respond to the needs of the border population by conducting activities in two related and chronological phases (prevalence study and intervention program).  Phase 1 assessed the prevalence of diabetes, related behavioral risk factors, and the health services for the border population. The information collected through a household survey will serve as a guide for the development of diabetes education and training activities in Phase 2.  The Community Intervention Pilot will be implemented in 11 pilot communities in the future.  They will be culturally appropriate and include the participation of community health workers (promotores) and primary health care providers.

CDCís Illinois Prevention Research Center has partnered with a Latino youth-serving organization, the Southwest Youth Collaborative, to conduct a community-based diabetes prevention and control program in two community areas on Chicago's southwest side.  The demonstration project will focus on individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes and individuals in their environment, specifically, their families and their health providers.  These individuals influence the person with diabetes, and in turn, are influenced by the person with diabetes.  In addition, the project will create a social context and program support for successful diabetes prevention and management.

CDCís National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID)
CDCís National Center for Infectious Diseasesí (NCID) mission is to prevent illness, disability, and death caused by infections and diseases in the United States and around the world.  In 2001, several of NCIDís major goals and objectives were to increase outreach to Hispanics/Latinos through demonstrations and collaborative research projects. A United States/Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project provides a sentinel surveillance system for emerging infections and other communicable diseases of public health importance for this region and continues to be a pivotal program for this area.

In 2002, CDC/NCID developed the Hispanic/Latino Initiative aimed at enhancing Latino public health workforce participation and at reducing infectious disease morbidity and mortality among Latinos, in particular reducing health disparities experienced by Hispanic/Latino population groups.  Through NCID, CDC assisted in publishing proceedings from the First Puerto Rican Conference on Public Health organized by the University of Puerto Rico and collaborated with the Puerto Rico Health Department, the Childrenís Museum of San Juan, the Puerto Rico Department of Education, and the Rotary Club of San Juan.

CDCís Epidemiology Program Office (EPO)
CDC, through its public health training in the Epidemiology Program Office (EPO), serves the nation and the world by providing a cadre of well-trained public health professionals.  Training opportunities include the Epidemic Intelligence Service program, Preventive Medicine Residency program, Public Health Prevention Service program, Public Health Informatics fellowships, Prevention Effectiveness fellowships, undergraduate and graduate medical electives, Knight Journalism fellowships, Field Epidemiology Training Program, Training Programs in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network, and other fellowship and internship programs for international students. During FY 2003, EPO will develop an integrated strategy to ensure more minority representation in all of its public health training programs.  For this effort to be successful, the project will need to be collaborated on with CDC's Office of Minority Health, other major CDC training programs, traditional partners (e.g., the Association of State and Territorial Health Directors, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine), and new partners (e.g., the Hispanic-Serving Health Professions Schools, Inc., the Asian Medical Student Association, and the Tribal College and University Program).  Such collaborations will assist EPO in developing a five-year marketing plan for identifying successful strategies and partnerships for attracting minorities to CDC's training and employment programs.

CDCís National Immunization Program (NIP)
In 2002, CDC, through its National Immunization Program (NIP), contracted with HMA Associates, a multi-cultural advertising and marketing firm, to produce, distribute, and market immunization messages and media products to Spanish-speaking Hispanics via media outlets, health care providers, community leaders, and other culturally relevant venues.  A Spanish-language public service campaign with the theme, ďLa PromesaĒ (ďThe PromiseĒ), was developed and unveiled during National Infant Immunization Week at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
La Promesa Public Service Campaign
Campaign Objectives
sphere To inform Hispanic parents of the need to immunize their children before they reach age two
sphere To stress the importance of staying on schedule with the recommended childhood immunizations
sphere To make Hispanic parents aware of the national Spanish-language Immunization Information Hotline
sphere To educate Hispanics about the dangers of vaccine-preventable diseases
    Campaign Components
sphere Television public service announcements (PSAs)
sphere Radio audio news releases (ANRs)
sphere Full-color informational booklet on vaccines
sphere
 
Advertisement placements in popular national Spanish-language magazines

The radio ANR was sent to approximately 260 Spanish language radio stations; the television and visual/video news releases (VNRs) were sent to 125 Spanish language television stations, plus UNIVISION and Telemundo television networks. Nearly $13 million was received in donated Television media. The television PSAs and radio ANR targeted an audience of more than 34,500,000 Hispanics in nearly 9,700,000 households. The radio ANR was aired by 36 radio stations with 27,186,400 audience impressions. In addition, Latina Magazine donated full-page advertisements for the months of August, September, October, and November.  More than 50,000 Spanish-language infant immunization posters and 1,900 Spanish-language infant immunization booklets were distributed to more than 150 community-based organizations and health providers in 25 states. As a result of the campaign, the toll-free Spanish-language Immunization Hotline received 4,466 calls. A random sampling of calls received indicated that 66 percent of callers became aware of the hotline though materials developed for the 2002 Spanish-language campaign.

CDC/NIP has a cooperative agreement with the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, which has implemented a program called Vacunas para la familia Immunizations for All Ages, which promotes immunization to improve childhood, adolescent, and adult immunization coverage in selected Hispanic communities for the purpose of eliminating racial/ethnic disparities. This grantee is in contractual agreement with six community-based organizations known as lead agencies that service a large Hispanic population.
    Communities/Lead Agencies
    sphere San Antonio, Texas -
Barrio Comprehensive Family Health Care Centers
    sphere Phoenix, Arizona -Concillo Latino de Salud
    sphere Oklahoma City, Oklahoma -
Latino Community Development Agency
    sphere Miami, Florida -
Little Havana Activities & Nutrition Centers of Dade County
    sphere Los Angeles, California -
Multicultural Area Health Education Center
    sphere New York, New York -Puerto Rican Family Institute

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)
CDC, through ATSDR, contributed $10,000 to the National Hispanic Youth Initiative sponsored by the Interamerican College of Physicians and Surgeons, via a cooperative agreement with the Office of Minority Health at HHS. This Initiative motivates and encourages Hispanic youth to pursue a career in the areas of health science and biomedical research. It provides participants with knowledge and skills in health and scientific research, introduces a broad range of opportunities available in the government and private sectors, and influences participants to pursue a career in the health sciences and biomedical research.
 

Click below to link to the Funding Tables in Sections 3, 4 & 5.

3.  Summary of Division Funding to Hispanic Serving Institutions
     and Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools

 

4.  Combined awards to Hispanic Serving Institutions and
     Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools

 

5.  Agency Hispanic American Employment


 

 

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