Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC Home Search CDC CDC Health Topics A-Z    
   
small bar spacer OMHD Home About Us Sitemap Contact Us bar spacer    
Small horizontal bar collage containing four portraits; each of person of a different racial or ethnic background.
About Minority Health
Cooperative Agreements
Executive Orders
Reports & Publications
Minority Health Resources
All Populations
Racial & Ethnic Minority Populations
Training Opportunities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Modified: September 5, 2007
Last Reviewed: September 5, 2007
Content Source:
Office of Minority Health & Health Disparities (OMHD)


Highlights in Minority Health
& Health Disparities
September, 2007

 

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

 
YOUTH  RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEILLANCE, Data from 2005
Priority health-risk behaviors, which contribute to the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among youth and adults, often are established during childhood and adolescence.  These behaviors often extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable.  The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS) monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults, including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity.1
National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data are used to measure progress toward achieving 15 national health objectives for Healthy People 2010 and three of the 10 leading health indicators, to assess trends in priority health-risk behaviors among high school students, and to evaluate the impact of broad school and community interventions at the national, state, and local levels.  The 2005 YRBS Report was released June 9, 2006.  Click here for the full report.1

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

EXAMPLES OF IMPORTANT DISPARITIES
Certain risk behaviors are more likely to occur among subpopulations of students defined by sex, race/ethnicity, and grade.  Additional research is needed to asses the effect of specific socioeconomic, cultural, and racial/ethnic factors on the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among high school students.2
Race and Ethnicity
Black or African American (BAA) students were more likely than Hispanic/Latino (HL) and white (W) students to have engaged in health risk behaviors relating to
Physical activity:
African American students were more likely to have
purple square Used computers ≥ 3 hours per day (played video or computer games or used a computer for something that was not school work on an average school day) (BAA: 25.2%; HL: 19.8%; W: 19.6%)
purple square Watched television ≥ 3 hours per day (on an average school day) (BAA: 64.1%; HL: 45.8%; W: 29.2%)
purple square Not participated in from vigorous or moderate physical activity (during the 7 days preceding the survey) (BAA: 14.4%; HL: 10.6%; W: 8.1%).
Sexual activity:
African American students were more likely to have
purple square Been currently sexually active (had sexual intercourse with ≥1 person during the three months preceding the survey) (BAA: 47.4%; HL: 35.0%; W: 32.0%)
purple square Ever had sexual intercourse (BAA: 67.6%; HL: 51.0%; W 43.0%)
purple square Had sexual intercourse before age 13 years (BAA: 16.5%; HL: 7.3%; W: 4.0%)
purple square Had sexual intercourse with four or more persons during their life (BAA: 28.2%; HL: 15.9%; W: 11.4%).
Injuries:
Among students who rode a bicycle in the preceding 12 months,
purple square 92.0% of African Americans rarely or never wore a bicycle helmet, compared to 86.5% of Hispanics/Latinos and 84.5% of whites.3

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

Hispanic/Latino students were more likely than African American and White students to have engaged in health risk behaviors relating to
Sexual activity:
orange square Among currently sexually active students, 42.3% of Hispanics/Latinos did not use a condom during last sexual intercourse, compared to 31.1% of African Americans and 37.4% of whites.
Injuries:
Hispanic/Latino students were more likely to have
orange square Ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol (in a car or other vehicle one or more times during the 30 days preceding the survey) (HL: 36.1%; BAA: 24.1%; W: 28.3%)
orange square Attempted suicide (one or more times during the 12 months preceding the survey) (HL: 11.3%; BAA: 7.6%; W: 7.3%).
Substance Use:
Hispanic/Latino students were more likely to have used one or more times during their life
orange square Cocaine (HL: 12.2%; BAA: 2.3%; W: 7.7%)
orange square Heroin (HL: 3.6%; BAA: 1.5%; W: 2.2%)
orange square Methamphetamine (HL: 8.8%; BAA: 1.7%; W: 6.5%)
orange square Ecstasy (HL: 9.6%; BAA: 3.9%; W: 5.8%).3

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

White students were more likely than African American and Hispanic/Latino students to have engaged in health risk behaviors relating to
Tobacco and alcohol:
White students were more likely to have
green square Smoked cigarettes on ≥ 20 of the 30 days preceding the survey (W: 11.2%; BAA: 3.7%; HL: 6.5%)
green square Used smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip on ≥1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) (W: 10.2%; BAA: 1.7%; HL: 5.1%)
green square Had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row (on ≥1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) (W: 29.9%; BAA: 11.1%; HL: 25.3%).
Diet:
green square White students were more likely to have not eaten fruits and vegetables ≥5 times per day (during the 7 days preceding the survey) (81.4%) compared to African American students (77.9%) and Hispanic/Latino students (76.8%).3

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

Gender
Female (F) students were more likely than male (M) students to have engaged in health risk behaviors relating to
Injuries:
Female students were more likely to have
red square Ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol (in a car or other vehicle one or more times during the 30 days preceding the survey) (F: 29.6%; M: 27.2%)
red square Attempted suicide (one or more times during the 12 months preceding the survey) (F: 10.8%; M: 6.0%).
Physical activity:
Female students were more likely to have
red square Not participated in from vigorous or moderate physical activity (during the 7 days preceding the survey) (F: 11.3%; M: 7.9%)
red square Not met recommended levels of physical activity (physically active doing any kind of physical activity that increased their heart rate and made them breathe hard some of the time for a total of at least 60 minutes/day on ≤ 5 of the 7 days preceding the survey) (F: 72.2%; M: 56.2%)
red square Not attended physical education classes (on one more more days in an average week when they were in school) (F: 51.7%; M: 40.0%).
Sexual activity:
red square Among students who were currently sexually active, female students were less likely to have used a condom during last sexual intercourse (44.1% did not use a condom) compared to male students (30.0%).
Substance use:
red square Female students were more likely to have used inhalants one or more times during their life (13.5%) compared to male students (11.3%).
Dieting:
Female students were more likely to have
red square Gone without eating for 24 hours or more to lose weight or keeping from gaining weight (during the 30 days preceding the survey) (F: 17.0%; M: 7.6%)
red square Taken diet pills, powders, or liquids to lose weight or keep from gaining weight (during the 30 days preceding the survey) (F: 8.1%; M: 4.6%)
red square Vomited or taken laxatives to lose weight or keep from gaining weight (during the 30 days preceding the survey) (F: 6.2%; M: 2.8%).4

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

Male (M) students were more likely than female (F) students to have engaged in health risk behaviors relating to
Injuries:
Male students were more likely to have
blue square Rarely or never worn a seat belt when riding in a car driven by someone else (M: 7.8%; F: 12.5%)
blue square Driven a car when drinking alcohol (during the 30 days preceding the survey) (M: 11.7%; F: 8.1%)
blue square Carried a weapon (for example, a gun, knife, or club on ≥ 1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) (M: 29.8%; F: 7.1%)
blue square Rarely or never worn a bicycle helmet (among students who had ridden a bicycle during the 12 months preceding the survey) (M: 86.1; F: 79.9%)
blue square Engaged in physical fighting (one or more times during the 12 months preceding the survey) (M: 43.4%; F: 28.1%).
Alcohol and tobacco:
Male students were more likely to have
blue square Used smokeless tobacco (on ≥ 1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) (M: 13.6%; F: 2.2%)
blue square Used cigars (on ≥ 1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) (M: 19.2%; F: 8.7%)
blue square Had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row (on ≥ 1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) (M: 27.5% F: 23.5%).
Substance use:
Male students were more likely to have used one or more times during their life
blue square Marijuana (M: 40.9%; F: 35.9%),
blue square Cocaine (M: 8.4%; F: 6.8%),
blue square Illegal steroids (M: 4.8%; F: 3.2%),
blue square Hallucinogenic drugs (M: 10.2%; F; 6.8%), and
blue square Ecstasy (M: 7.2%; F: 5.3%).
Sexual activity:
blue square Male students were more likely to have had sexual intercourse with four or more persons during their life (M: 16.5% F: 12.0%).
Weight and Physical activity:
Male students were more likely to have
blue square Been overweight (M: 16.0%; F: 10.0%)
blue square Used computers  ≥ 3 hours per day (played video or computer games or used a computer for something that was not school work on an average school day) (M: 27.4%; F: 14.8%).4
More effective school health programs and other policy and programmatic interventions are needed to reduce risk and improve health outcomes among youth.1

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

FOR MORE INFORMATION
  MMWR June 9,2006 / 55 (ss05); 1-108, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2005
  CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Healthy Youth, Youth Risk behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS)
  YRBS 2005 Health Risk Behaviors by Race/Ethnicity
  YRBS 2005 Health Risk Behaviors by Sex
  CDC's NCCDPHP, Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH), Healthy Schools, Healthy Youth
  CDC Youth Media Campaign VERB

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

SOURCES
1. MMWR June 9,2006 / 55 (ss05); 1-108, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2005
2. MMWR June 9,2006 / 55 (ss05); 1-108, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2005 p. 31
3. YRBS 2005 Health Risk Behaviors by Race/Ethnicity
4. YRBS 2005 Health Risk Behaviors by Sex

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

 

Conferences
& Events

Section Menu

  red square Conferences
& Events
  red square Current
Highlight
  red square Archive
Highlights
    2007
red square  January
red square  February
red square  May
red square  June
red square  June
red square  July
red square  August
red square  September
red square  Sept/October
red square  November

 

 
 

OMHD Home | About OMHD | Sitemap | Contact OMHD
Accessibility | Privacy Policy | CDC Sitemap | Search | Health Topics A-Z

Office of Minority Health & Health Disparities (OMHD)

Please Note: Links to non-Federal organizations found at this site are provided solely as a service to our users. These links do not constitute an endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the Federal Government, and none should be inferred. The CDC is not responsible for the content of the individual organization Web pages found at these links.
 


 

 
  Home | Policies and Regulations | Disclaimer | e-Government | FOIA | Other Languages | Link To Us | Contact Us  
  Safer, Healthier People
 
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333, U.S.A.
  800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636), TTY: (888) 232-6348
  24 hours/Every Day - cdcinfo@cdc.gov
  USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDHHS Department of Health and Human Services