Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC Home Search CDC CDC Health Topics A-Z    
   
small bar spacer OMHD Home About Us Sitemap Contact Us bar spacer    
Small horizontal bar collage containing four portraits; each of person of a different racial or ethnic background.
About Minority Health
Cooperative Agreements
Executive Orders
Reports & Publications
Minority Health Resources
All Populations
Racial & Ethnic Minority Populations
Training Opportunities

 

 

Archived
June, 2007


Highlights in Minority Health
& Health Disparities
November, 2006

 

     American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month November, 2006

 
NOVEMBER 2006 IS AMERICAN INDIAN / ALASKA NATIVE HERITAGE MONTH
National American Indian Heritage Month honors the many contributions and accomplishments of American Indians and Alaska Natives. During November, we remember the legacy of the first Americans and celebrate their vibrant and living traditions.1 During this month, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will join with other Federal departments and agencies, local government offices, national and local organizations, and interested individuals to recognize American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) contributions to the development and history of the United States.2
The Census Bureau estimates that 4.4 million people are American Indian or Alaska Native alone or in combination with one or more other races as of July 1, 2004, making up 1.5% of the total population.3

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

EXAMPLES OF IMPORTANT HEALTH DISPARITIES
A variety of health disparities affect AI/AN communities:2
purple square In 2001, AI/ANs had the highest rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) of all racial/ethnic groups (124.2 per 1,000 live births), 2.2 times higher than the rate for all populations (55.5 per 1,000), and 8 times higher than the rate for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (15.5), the group with the lowest SIDS rate.4
purple square After African Americans, AI/ANs had the highest diabetes death rate in 2003 (43.7 per 100,000 population), 1.7 times higher than the rate for all populations (25.3 per 100,000), and 2.5 times higher than the rate for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (17.3).5
purple square In 2003, AI/ANs had the highest death rate from Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis (22.6 per 100,000), 2.4 times higher than the rate for all populations (9.3 per 100,000) 7.5 times higher than the rate for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (3.0).5
purple square In 2003, AI/ANs were 1.5 times more likely to die from unintentional injuries (56.9 per 100,000) compared to all races combined (37.2 per 100,000).  AI/ANs were 1.9 times more likely to die from a motor vehicle injury (28.4 per 100,000) compared to all populations combined (15.3 per 100,000).6
purple square In 2004, the rate of Gonorrhea among AI/ANs was 117.7 per 100,000 per 100,000 population, 5.5 times higher than the rate among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, the group with the lowest rate (21.4).7

The rate of Chlamydia among AI/ANs was 705.8 per 100,000, 5.3 times higher than the rate among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, the group with the lowest rate (133.7).8.
purple square The estimated rate of AIDS diagnoses for American Indian and Alaska Native adults and adolescents was 9.9 per 100,000 persons, the 3rd highest rate after those for African American adults and adolescents (72.1 per 100,000) and Hispanic adults and adolescents (25.0 per 100,000). The estimated AIDS diagnosis rate was 7.1 per 100,000 for white adults and adolescents and 4.4 per 100,000 for Asian and Pacific Islander adults and adolescents.9

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

PROGRAMS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
To address these disparities, CDC and ATSDR work with tribal governments, tribal organizations, urban Indian health centers, IHS, and other partners to establish and increase partnerships, increase collaborations, and provide funding and technical assistance.2
During the past Fiscal Year, CDC and ATSDR have begun implementing their Tribal Consultation Policy (TCP) that provides agency guidance for working effectively with AI/AN communities and organizations, as well as enhancing AI/AN access to CDC and ATSDR programs.  The policy identifies when CDC programs should involve Tribal leaders and outlines specific responsibilities regarding program activities, including mutual participation in setting program and budget priorities.  CDC and ATSDR also commit professional staff to positions in Indian country and work with the Indian Health Service (IHS) to strengthen AI/AN public health infrastructure and capacity.

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  CDC's Office of Minority Health (OMH)
    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Populations
    American Indian & Alaska Native National, Regional & Local Health Boards List
    Tribal Epidemiology Centers
    CDC's Tribal Consultation Policy
    569 American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes
  CDC Office on Smoking and Health
  American Indians and Alaska Natives and Tobacco
  ATSDR Office of Tribal Affairs
Indian Health Service
Indian Health Service (IHS) AI/AN Heritage Month Events
White House Presidential Proclamation
White House Executive Order 13270: Tribal Colleges and Universities
U.S. Census Bureau Facts on the AI/AN Population
Bureau of Indian Affairs
FirstGov for Tribal Governments and American Indians
National Council of Urban Indian Health
Social Security Online: American Indians and Alaska Natives
Healthfinder: American Indians and Alaska Natives
Medline Plus: Native American Health
Administration on Aging (AoA)
American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians
Rural Aging
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
American Diabetes Association: Native Americans
National Indian Council On Aging (NICOA)
National Indian Health Board (NIHB)
National Native American AIDS Prevention Center (NNAAPC)

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

SOURCES
  1. The White House, National American Indian Heritage Month, 2005
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities (OMHD), Highlights in Minority Health, November 2004
  3. U.S. Census Bureau, Facts for Features: American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month: November 2005
  4. CDC National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics Report, Deaths: Leading Causes for 2001, 52(9), 2003
  5. CDC, NCHS, Health, United States, 2005, table 29
  6. CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC),Web-based Injury statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)
  7. CDC, National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHSTP), STD Surveillance 2004; table 21b
  8. CDC, NCHSTP, STD Surveillance 2004, table 11b
  9. CDC, NCHSTP, HIV/AIDS Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, 2006

Top of Pageto top of page, arrow up

 

Conferences
& Events

Section Menu

  red square Conferences
& Events
  red square Current
Highlight
  red square Archive
Highlights
    2006
red square  January
red square  February
red square  May
red square  May
red square  June
red square  June
red square  July
red square  August
red square  September
red square  Sept/October
red square  October
red square  October
red square  November
red square  December

 

 
 

OMHD Home | About OMHD | Sitemap | Contact OMHD
Accessibility | Privacy Policy | CDC Sitemap | Search | Health Topics A-Z

Office of Minority Health & Health Disparities (OMHD)

Please Note: Links to non-Federal organizations found at this site are provided solely as a service to our users. These links do not constitute an endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the Federal Government, and none should be inferred. The CDC is not responsible for the content of the individual organization Web pages found at these links.
 


 

 
  Home | Policies and Regulations | Disclaimer | e-Government | FOIA | Other Languages | Link To Us | Contact Us  
  Safer, Healthier People
 
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333, U.S.A.
  800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636), TTY: (888) 232-6348
  24 hours/Every Day - cdcinfo@cdc.gov
  USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDHHS Department of Health and Human Services