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Archived
June, 2007


Highlights in Minority Health
June, 2005
Mens Health Week, June 13-19, 2005

 

JUNE13-19, 2005 IS MEN'S HEALTH WEEK

Men make up 49.1% of the United States population, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.  The purpose of Men's Health Week is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys.
Compared with women, men have higher death rates for the leading causes of death (see Table 1).  Men have unique health challenges.  For example,
  red arrow Men tend to smoke and drink more than women and generally have less healthy lifestyles.
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Men do not seek medical help as often as women.

  red arrow Men tend to join in fearless, risky, dangerous behaviors more than women.
  red arrow Men are significantly less likely than women to recognize the health benefits of fruits and vegetables, such as their role in reducing the risk of many cancers, heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes.
The good news is that many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented and treated if they are diagnosed early.
Racial and ethnic minority men, especially African Americans, are even more at-risk for dying from certain causes, including injuries, chronic diseases, and infectious illnesses.

TABLE 1: Age-adjusted deaths per 100,000 population for the leading causes of death, United States: 2002

Leading Causes of Death
for Men
  Leading Causes of Death
for Women
All Causes 1013.7   All Causes 715.2
1. Heart Disease 297.4   1. Heart Disease 197.2
2. Cancer 238.9   2. Cancer 163.1
3. Stroke 56.5   3. Stroke 55.2
4. Chronic lower respiratory disease 53.5   4. Chronic lower respiratory disease 37.4
5. Unintentional injuries 51.5   5. Unintentional injuries 23.5
6. Diabetes 28.6   6. Diabetes 23.0
7. Influenza & pneumonia 27.0   7. Influenza & pneumonia 19.9
8. Suicide 18.4   8. Chronic liver disease & cirrhosis 6.3
9. Chronic liver disease & cirrhosis 12.9   9. Suicide 4.2
10. Homicide 9.4   10. Homicide 2.8
11. HIV/AIDS 7.4   11. HIV/AIDS 2.5
Source: NCHS, Health US, 2004, table 29
EXAMPLES OF HEALTH DISPARITIES
In 2002,
  red arrow The life expectancy for males at birth was 5.4 years shorter than for females (male: 74.5; female: 79.9 years).
  red arrow The all-causes death rate for males was 1.4 times higher for men than for women (men: 1013.7 per 100,000; women: 715.2).
  red arrow Men had a cardiovascular disease (CVD) death rate that was 1.5 times higher than women (men: 297.4 per 100,000; women: 197.2).
  red arrow The HIV/AIDS death rate was 3.0 times higher for men than for women (men: 7.4 per 100,000; women: 2.5).
  red arrow Men had a total cancer death rate that was 1.5 times higher than women (men: 238.9 per 100,000; women: 163.1).
   
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Men had a lung cancer death rate that was 1.8 times higher than women (men: 73.2 per 100,000; women: 41.6.)
   
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Men had a colorectal cancer death rate that was 1.4 times higher than women (men: 23.7 per 100,000; women: 16.7).
  red arrow Men were 4.4 times more likely to die from suicide as women (men: 18.4 per 100,000; women: 4.2).
  red arrow Men were 2.2 times more likely to die from unintentional injuries than women (men: 51.6 per 100,000; women: 23.5).
  red arrow Men were 2.3 times more likely to die from motor vehicle injuries than women (men: 22.1 per 100,000; women: 9.6).

EXAMPLES OF IMPORTANT DISPARITIES BY RACE & ETHNICITY

  red arrow In 2002, African American men had the highest all-causes death rate of all races/ethnicities and both genders (1341.1 per 100,000); Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) men (578.4 per 100,000) had the lowest all-causes death rate. In addition, African American males had the shortest life expectancy at birth (68.8 years) compared to males of all races (74.5 years) and African American females (75.6 years).
  red arrow

African American men had the highest death rate for all races/ethnicities and both genders for the following causes (rates per 100,000 population):

   
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CVD (African American men: 371.0; all races/ethnicities men: 297.4) (2002),
   
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HIV/AIDS (African American men: 35.0; all races/ethnicities men: 7.9) (1999-2001),
   
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Lung cancer (African American men: 95.0; all races/ethnicities men: 73.2) (2002),
   
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Colorectal cancer (African American men: 34.1; all races/ethnicities men: 25.0) (1999-2001),
   
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Prostate cancer (African American men: 62.0; all races/ethnicities men: 27.9) (2002).
  red arrow

AI/AN men had the highest death rates for all races/ethnicities and both genders for the following causes (2002):

   
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Unintentional injuries (AI/AN men: 73.7; all races/ethnicities men: 51.6; AI/AN women: 35.3).
   
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Motor vehicle injuries (AI/AN men: 37.4; all races/ethnicities men: 22.2; AI/AN women: 19.3).

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
Office of Womenís Health (OWH)
National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC)
What Do You Know About Men's Health?
Screening Tests and Immunizations Guidelines for Men
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Men: Stay Healthy at Any Age
National Menís Health Week

 

 

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