Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC Home Search CDC CDC Health Topics A-Z    
   
small bar spacer OMHD Home About Us Sitemap Contact Us bar spacer    
Small horizontal bar collage containing four portraits; each of person of a different racial or ethnic background.
About Minority Health
Cooperative Agreements
Executive Orders
Reports & Publications
Minority Health Resources
All Populations
Racial & Ethnic Minority Populations
Training Opportunities

 

Esta página en Español

Archived
June, 2007


Highlights in Minority Health
September 25th, 2004

Family Health and Fitness Day USA Logo

 

September 25 is Family Health and Fitness Day

  Regular physical activity substantially reduces the risk of dying of coronary heart disease, the nation's leading cause of death, and decreases the risk for stroke, colon cancer, diabetes, and high blood pressure. It also helps to control weight; contributes to healthy bones, muscles, and joints; reduces falls among older adults; helps to relieve the pain of arthritis; reduces symptoms of anxiety and depression; and is associated with fewer hospitalizations, physician visits, and medications. Physical activity need not be strenuous to be beneficial; people of all ages benefit from participating in regular, moderate-intensity physical activity, such as 30 minutes of brisk walking five or more times a week.
  Despite the proven benefits of physical activity, more than 50% of American adults do not get enough physical activity to provide health benefits. Twenty-five percent of adults are not active at all in their leisure time. Activity decreases with age and is less common among women than men and among those with lower income and less education. More than a third of young people in grades 9–12 do not regularly engage in vigorous-intensity physical activity. Daily participation in high school physical education classes dropped from 42% in 1991 to 32% in 2001. Furthermore, there are racial and ethnic differences in physical activity rates, particularly among women.
  In 2003, Hispanics were least likely to report participating in any physical activity in the past month, while whites were the most likely to report leisure time physical activity in the past month (whites: 79.1%; Hispanics/Latinos: 67.9%; blacks: 70.1%; other: 75.6%; multiracial: 75.0%).
 

For More Information

  National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP)
    Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity (DNPA)
      Physical Activity
      Promoting Physical Activity: A Guide for Community Action
  National heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
    Guide to Physical Activity
 

 

 

Conferences
& Events

Section Menu

  red square Conferences
& Events
  red square Current
Highlight
  red square Archive
Highlights
    2004
red square  November
red square  November
red square  November
red square  November
red square  October
red square  October
red square  Sept./October
red square  Sept./October
red square  September
red square  September
red square  September
red square  September
red square  September
red square  August
red square  June/July
red square  May
red square  May
red square  April
red square  April
red square  March
red square  February
red square  February
         In Focus
red square  January
red square  January

2003

2002

 

 
 

OMHD Home | About OMHD | Sitemap | Contact OMHD
Accessibility | Privacy Policy | CDC Sitemap | Search | Health Topics A-Z

Office of Minority Health & Health Disparities (OMHD)

Please Note: Links to non-Federal organizations found at this site are provided solely as a service to our users. These links do not constitute an endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the Federal Government, and none should be inferred. The CDC is not responsible for the content of the individual organization Web pages found at these links.
 


 

 
  Home | Policies and Regulations | Disclaimer | e-Government | FOIA | Other Languages | Link To Us | Contact Us  
  Safer, Healthier People
 
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333, U.S.A.
  800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636), TTY: (888) 232-6348
  24 hours/Every Day - cdcinfo@cdc.gov
  USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDHHS Department of Health and Human Services