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Archived
June, 2007


Highlights in Minority Health

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month
 

MAY IS ASIAN/PACIFIC AMERICAN  HERITAGE MONTH
During the observance of Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month, we celebrate the cultural traditions, ancestry, native languages, and unique experiences represented among the more than 30 ethnic groups from Asia and the Pacific who live in the United States. We also recognize millions of Asian/Pacific Americans whose love of family, hard work, and community has helped unite us as a people and sustain us as a Nation.
Asian American and Pacific Islanders represent one of the fastest-growing and most diverse populations in the United States.  Asian Americans represent both extremes of socioeconomic and health indices: while more than a million Asian Americans live at or below the federal poverty level, Asian  American women have the highest life expectancy of any other group.  While Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have the highest proportion of college graduates of any race or ethnic group, they suffer disproportionately from certain types of cancer, infectious diseases, and other chronic diseases.  For instance, Vietnamese women have an incidence rate of cervical cancer five times higher than white women, and Native Hawaiians are 2.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than non-Hispanic white residents of Hawaii.  While the rate of acute hepatitis B (HBV) among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders has been decreasing, the reported rate in 2001 was more than twice as high among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (3.0 per 100,000) as among white Americans (1.3 per 100,000).  Factors contributing to poor health outcomes among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders include language and cultural barriers, limited access to healthcare, poor nutrition, and unhealthy behaviors.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

 
    CDCís Office of Minority Health (OMH)
  Asian American Populations
  Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Populations
The White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders
White House Proclamation
Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
  Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage
    Environmental Protection Agency
  Asian American & Pacific Islander Initiative
U.S. Census Bureau
  The Asian Population: 2000
  The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Population: 2000
Asian Pacific American Heritage Association
Asian-Nation: The Landscape of Asian America
  Celebrate APA Heritage Month


 

 

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