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Fruits and Vegetables

"Eat your fruits and vegetables." You've likely heard this statement since childhood. Research shows why it is good advice:

  • Healthy diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.
  • Fruits and vegetables also provide essential vitamins and minerals, fiber, and other substances that are important for good health.
  • Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories and are filling.

Not sure how many fruits and vegetables you should be eating each day?

  • Visit the Fruit and Vegetable Calculator. Here you can calculate your fruit and vegetable recommendations based on your calorie needs for your age, sex, and activity level. This site also has helpful tips and photographs of 1/2 cup and 1 cup fruit and vegetable examples. choosemyplate.gov
  • Ever wondered what counted as ½ a cup of grapes or celery without counting? Visit: What Counts as a Cup? This visual example of what counts as a cup helps simplify the answer.
  • Want to know how much you need of each food group; including fruits and vegetables? Visit: MyPlate Daily Food Plan to find out and receive a customized Daily Food Plan.

Curious as to whether fruits and vegetables can help you manage your weight?

  • Take a look at this How to Use Fruits and Vegetables to Help Manage your Weight brochure and learn about fruits and vegetables and their role in your weight management plan. Tips to cut calories by substituting fruits and vegetables are included with meal-by-meal examples. You will also find snack ideas that are 100 calories or less. With these helpful tips, you will soon be on your way to adding more fruits and vegetables into your healthy eating plan.

Related Resources

NewCDC Vital Signs: Progress on children eating more fruit, but not more vegetables [PDF-16.9Mb]
CDC trend data finds that US children ages 2-18 are eating more fruit, but not more vegetables. Child care and schools can help children meet daily recommendations.
 
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