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Data and Statistics > NIS Data > Articles
Articles Related to NIS
The National Immunization Survey

by year of data collected
   
These articles appear in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) and other publications.
         Jump to:
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
   
1999

 

1998
  • National Immunization Survey: the methodology of a vaccination surveillance system.
    (No link available)
    Authors: Zell ER., Ezzati-Rice TM., Battaglia MP., Wright RA.
    Source: Public Health Reports. 115(1):65-77, 2000 Jan-Feb
    Abstract:
    The National Immunization Survey (NIS) was designed to measure vaccination coverage estimates for the US, the 50 states, and selected urban areas for children ages 19-35 months. The NIS includes a random-digit-dialed telephone survey and a provider record check study. Data are weighted to account for the sample design and to reduce nonresponse and non-coverage biases in order to improve vaccination coverage estimates. Adjustments are made for biases resulting from nonresponse and nontelephone households, and estimation procedures are used to reduce measurement bias. The NIS coverage estimates represent all US children, not just children living in households with telephones. NIS estimates are highly comparable to vaccination estimates derived from the National Health Interview Survey. The NIS allows comparisons between states and urban areas over time and is used to evaluate current and new vaccination strategies.
       
  • Note: See 1999 for Changes in vaccination coverage estimates among children aged 19-35 months in the U.S., 1996-1999.
  • Note: See 1999 for U.S. children living in and near poverty: Risk of vaccine-preventable disease, 1996-1999.
  • Note: See 1999 for Variation in vaccination coverage among children of Hispanic ancestry.

1997
  • Vaccination coverage and physician distribution in the United States, 1997.
    Source: Pediatrics, 107(3):E31, 2001 March.
    http://www.pediatrics.org/
  • Vaccines for Children Program, United States, 1997
    Source:
    PEDIATRICS Vol. 104 No. 2 August 1999, p. e15
    http://www.pediatrics.org

  • Progress in coverage with hepatitis B vaccine among US children, 1994-1997.
    (No link available)
    Authors: Yusuf HR., Coronado VG., Averhoff FA., Maes EF., Rodewald LE., Battaglia MP., Mahoney FJ.
    Source:  American Journal of Public Health. 89(11):1684-9, 1999 Nov.
    Results: A total of 32,433 household interviews were completed in the 1997 NIS. An estimated 83.7% of children aged 19 to 35 months received 3 or more doses of hepatitis B vaccine. Coverage with 3 doses was greater (86.7%) among children in states that had day care entry requirements for hepatitis B vaccination than among children in states without such requirements (83.0%) and was greater among children from families with incomes at or above the poverty level (85.0%) than among children below the poverty level (80.6%). Hepatitis B vaccination of children increased from 1994 through 1996, from 41% to 84%, but coverage reached a constant level of 84% to 85% in 1996/97. 
    Conclusion:
    Although substantial progress has been made in fully vaccinating children against hepatitis B, greater efforts are needed to ensure that all infants receive 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine.

  • Note: See 1999 for Changes in vaccination coverage estimates among children aged 19-35 months in the U.S., 1996-1999.
  • Note: See 1999 for U.S. children living in and near poverty: Risk of vaccine-preventable disease, 1996-1999.
  • Note: See 1999 for Variation in vaccination coverage among children of Hispanic ancestry.

1996 - 1997

1996

  • Note: See 1999 for Changes in vaccination coverage estimates among children aged 19-35 months in the U.S., 1996-1999.
  • Note: See 1999 for U.S. children living in and near poverty: Risk of vaccine-preventable disease, 1996-1999.
  • Note: See 1999 for Variation in vaccination coverage among children of Hispanic ancestry.
  • Note: See 1997 for Progress in coverage with hepatitis B vaccine among US children, 1994-1997.

1995
  • National, State, and Urban Area Vaccination Coverage Levels Among Children Aged 19-35 Months United States, January-December 1995
    Source: MMWR,
    February 28, 1997 / 46(08);176-182
    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00046725.htm
       
  • In (Table_2) of the report "National, State, and Urban Area Vaccination Coverage Levels Among Children Aged 19-35 Months -- United States, January-December 1995," the text of the ** and double dagger footnotes is incorrect. The corrected table appears on page 228.
    Source: MMWR,
    March 14, 1997 / 46(10);227
    Erratum: Vol. 46, No. 8
    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00046713.htm

  • Note: See 1997 for Progress in coverage with hepatitis B vaccine among US children, 1994-1997.
  • Note: See 1996 for Comparison of NIS and NHIS/NIPRCS vaccination coverage estimates.

1994 - 1995

1994

  • Note: See 1997 for Progress in coverage with hepatitis B vaccine among US children, 1994-1997.

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