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CANCER, REPRODUCTIVE, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

cancer, reproductive, cardiovascular

Activities: NIOSH Research Projects

Cancer Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment Methods

This project serves as an incubator for the exploration of possible new methodological projects in quantitative risk assessment, which are then spun into independent projects if they are judged to be feasible. The ultimate objective is to improve quantitative risk assessments performed in developing new or updated recommendations for occupational exposure limits. Methods currently under consideration for development include (1) quantitative adjustment for the healthy worker survival effect in epidemiological studies, (2) quantification of attributable risks and calculating years of life lost for completed and new risk assessments, (3) exploration of the potential for chromosomal aberration data to be used in quantitative risk assessment, and (4) analysis of the concordance of animal and human cancer data and whether that concordance is improved by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

Project contact: David Dankovic
Education and Information Division
(513) 533-8302
Project period: 10/1/2002–9/30/2011

Risk Assessment Methods for Particles and Fibers

The purpose of this research is to develop a mechanistic and scientific basis for quantitative risk assessment of occupational exposure to respirable particulates and fibers. This is being performed through the use of both traditional risk assessment methods and the development of biologically-based modeling using existing data in humans and animals. The concordance between the animal- and human-based risk estimates is being evaluated. These findings will provide a framework for predicting disease risk in humans exposed to other types of respirable particles and fibers for which we have rodent bioassay data but insufficient epidemiological data. This project is expected to provide a scientific basis for future NIOSH recommendations on occupational exposures to particles and fibers.

Project contact: Eileen Kuempel
Education and Information Division
(513) 533-8302
Project period: 10/1/1999–9/30/2006

Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment is an ongoing project that was initiated to address the needs for quantitative and qualitative risk assessments in support of NIOSH internal policy development, and the development of occupational exposure limits by our regulatory partners at OSHA and the Mine Safety and Health Administration. In FY2006, we are planning to explore the feasibility of risk assessments for antimony compounds, beryllium, acrylamide, and other occupational exposures as appropriate.

Project contact: Chris Sofge
Education and Information Division
(513) 533-8302
Project period: 10/1/1984–9/30/2011

Silica, Lung Cancer, and Respiratory Disease Quantitative Risk

Exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with a number of debilitating and fatal diseases, including silicosis, lung cancer, and immunologic disorders. This project will develop quantitative risk assessments for lung cancer and nonmalignant respiratory disease from occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica.

Project contact: Faye Rice
Education and Information Division
(513) 533-8302
Project period: 10/1/1997–9/30/2006


Cancer Research—Laboratory-Based

Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis Caused by Occupational Exposure to Metals

The purpose of this project is to elucidate molecular mechanisms leading to metal-induced cancer. Specifically, the role of reactive oxidant species and discrete signaling pathways in the regulation of apoptosis or cell proliferation will be determined. This project will investigate the mechanisms by which workers, occupationally exposed to metals or metal-containing particles (e.g., chromium, nickel, and arsenic), develop cancer. The hypothesis is that free radical reactions play an important role. Electron spin resonance and molecular biology techniques will be employed to determine the mechanisms involved in metal-induced carcinogenesis in human keratinocytes and in the skin of hairless mice. Overall, the proposed experiments will provide a fundamental understanding of the role of various reactive species and oxidative stress in the underlying mechanisms contributing to tumor promotion and skin carcinogenesis by metals.

Project contact: Xianglin Shi
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2004–9/30/2008

Molecular Mechanisms of Cadmium Carcinogenesis

Cadmium, an established human carcinogen, is an important metal for industrial uses. A large number of workers are potentially exposed to cadmium. Exposure to cadmium is known to cause cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to protect the workers who are exposed to cadmium from its carcinogenic effects. The goal of this project is to investigate the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis using appropriate experimental models. Using modern molecular biology techniques, the expression profile of genes responsible for cadmium carcinogenesis and the associated pathways and networks will be studied in cells and in experimental animals exposed to cadmium. The data obtained from these studies will be used to develop biomarkers for exposure to cadmium and the resulting carcinogenesis as well as to develop preventive strategies against cadmium carcinogenesis.

Project contact: Joseph Pius
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2004–9/30/2008

Genetic Susceptibility to Occupationally Induced Cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and is second only to bladder cancer in the number of cases linked to occupational exposure. This 5-year project will allow the localization, screening, and identification of genes that are involved in susceptibility and resistance to lung cancer and melanoma. Analysis of these genes will allow identification of the populations that are susceptible to the development of occupationally related lung cancer and may provide biomarkers for occupational exposure and the early detection and staging of lung cancer and melanoma.

Project contact: Steven Reynolds
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2003–9/30/2008

Chemoprevention of Occupational Carcinogenesis

Research has shown that occupational exposures can cause cancer, and a need exists to study strategies for occupational cancer prevention. The purpose of this study is to investigate anti-cancer agents that could be used for intervention in causation of occupational cancer. This study will examine the influence of anti-cancer agents on early effects of occupational exposures, as well as their ability to benefit all members of the workforce. Inter-individual variation in response to certain occupational exposures in a laboratory model has already been documented. The ability of anti-cancer agents to mitigate this response is now under investigation. This project provides an opportunity to transform knowledge concerning inter-individual variability from the laboratory to applications in the workplace. Also, there is the long-term potential to reduce the burden of occupational cancer.

Project contact: Ainsley Weston
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2003–9/30/2006

Receptor-Mediated Events in Occupational Disease

Exposure to chemicals in the workplace can cause a variety of pathological symptoms and diseases. Increasing evidence indicates that receptor-mediated regulation of gene expression plays a major role in determining the biological responses to many occupational toxic chemicals. The role and mechanism of action of AhR, Nrf2, and MTF-1 in toxicity of HAHs/PAHs, chemoprotection by phenolic antioxidants, or responses to toxic heavy metals, are being examined in depth in experimental models, respectively. To date, the results indicate that AhR, NRF2, and MTF-1 play essential roles in determining toxic responses to several classes of chemicals, such as work place-related oxidative chemicals, heavy metals and carcinogenic PAHs. These studies should provide new insights into the mechanism of receptor-mediated toxic responses to occupational chemicals, and will facilitate identification and application of sensitive, specific, and quantitative biomarkers, better analysis of dose-response relationship, and accurate evaluation of toxic responses to mixtures of chemicals, thus help improving the accuracy of risk assessment at workplace.

Project contact: Qiang Ma
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2003–9/30/2006

Biomarker Development for Field Studies

Biomarker Development for Field Studies, an umbrella methods development project for the Molecular and Genetic Monitoring Team, is designed to provide the biomonitoring analyses required for field investigations of occupational exposures through development and application of new analytical methods and modification of published methods. Biomarker methods will be developed and applied for occupational toxicants to assess exposure and effects of exposure. Application of these biomonitoring methods to field investigations will provide measurements of internal dose in workers, which will complement traditional exposure assessment data. The biomarkers developed in this project will provide a more comprehensive characterization of occupational exposure hazards and will assist in determining the efficacy of control technologies in preventing exposure.

Project contact: Kenneth Cheever
Division of Applied Research and Technology
(513) 533-8462
Project period: 10/1/2004–9/30/2009


Cancer Research—Field Studies

Development of Epidemiologic Research Methods

The goal of this project is to develop methods and software to analyze epidemiologic studies and update cohort master files. NIOSH has played a leading role in developing analytic methods for occupational epidemiology studies. Appropriate software for analyses sometimes must be developed because it is not commercially available. We are developing software to automatically update cohort databases with vital status and demographic information. Recent accomplishments include the creation of a more powerful, user-friendly life table analysis program; the development of rate files that allow investigators to examine mortality for all causes rather than only the underlying cause of death and cancer incidence referent rates from national cancer registry data; conversion of study databases into a more user-friendly and powerful database management system; and the automation of vital status ascertainment procedures.

Project contact: Mary Schubauer-Berigan
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1985–09/30/2007

Breast Cancer Incidence among Former Pan Am Flight Attendants

This cancer incidence study of approximately 10,000 former Pan American World Airways flight attendants will determine whether female flight attendants are at increased risk of breast and other cancers. Exposures that may affect breast cancer risk in flight attendants include cosmic radiation and circadian rhythm disruption from traveling across multiple time zones. If the findings indicate that health effects result from these exposures, interventions, guidelines, or regulations may be implemented to reduce these exposures.

Project contact: Lynne Pinkerton
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1998–09/30/2007

Case-Control Study of Leukemia and External Radiation

This case-control study is evaluating the association between exposure to ionizing radiation from external sources and the risk of dying from leukemia. The study adjusts for potential confounding from exposure to chemical leukemogens, plutonium, and cigarette smoking. A total of 257 leukemia cases have been identified from the combined cohort of workers at the four Department of Energy sites and one U.S. Navy nuclear shipyard included in this epidemiologic study. Four controls have been selected for each case, resulting in a study population of 1,269 subjects drawn from an original cohort of 94,517 eligible workers. During FY2004, the radiological and chemical exposure assessments, excluding neutron exposures, were completed for all study subjects. The epidemiologic analysis and final report development was initiated. During FY2005, the neutron exposure assessment was completed. The epidemiologic analyses are ongoing. NIOSH received the report from the subcontractor.

Project contact: Robert Daniels
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1995–09/30/2006

Mortality Patterns Among Chemical Lab Workers

Limited studies have reported that an association may exist between exposures in chemical laboratories and several types of cancer. This study will examine the risk of cause-specific mortality among workers in chemical laboratories at four Department of Energy sites. Mortality among these chemical laboratory workers will be compared to U.S. and regional populations, and internal comparisons will be completed using statistical methods. An exposure assessment for ionizing radiation and two classes of chemical compounds will be conducted. Qualitative job exposure matrices for internal ionizing radiation and chemical classes will be used in the statistical data analysis to assess potential relationships with site-specific cancers.

Project contact: Travis Kubale
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1996–09/30/2006

A Case-Control Study of Primary Intracranial Gliomas Among Rural Residents

This project is concerned with the increase in brain cancer and its etiology. Farmers are one occupational group in which excess risk for brain cancer has been noted. Using a case-control design, this study is evaluating associations between rural exposures and primary intracranial gliomas, the most common type of brain tumors, among male and female rural residents in four upper Midwestern states; it focuses on determining whether pesticides, N-nitroso compounds, electromagnetic fields, biological agents, and solvents are associated with increased glioma risk. The study includes 798 cases and 1,175 controls. Through improved knowledge of risk factors for gliomas, appropriate primary prevention strategies can be developed to reduce the incidence of this nearly uniformly fatal disease.

Project contact: Avima Ruder
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513)841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1994–09/30/2008

Mortality, Cancer Incidence, and Biomarker Studies

NIOSH conducts epidemiologic cancer studies to elucidate exposure-outcome relationships, including dose-response relationships for risk assessment and relationships between biomarkers of exposure effect. Current studies involve exposures of great public health concern, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and beryllium. NIOSH studies have influenced governmental agencies, industries, and public health authorities and have permitted the categorization of human carcinogens by expert industrial hygienists, epidemiologists, and toxicologists convened by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and OSHA.

Project contact: Avima Ruder
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1970–09/30/2010

Polychlorinated biphenyls/ethylene oxide (PCB/EtO) Breast Cancer

Increasing numbers of women are employed outside the home, yet few studies of breast cancer etiology have addressed occupational and environmental chemical exposures, and many cancer studies of industrial cohorts have excluded women. EtO and PCB compounds are suspected breast carcinogens. This project will determine the incidence of breast cancer in women exposed to EtO and women exposed to PCB compounds. Breast cancer cases will be ascertained through death certificates and questionnaires administered to living subjects and next-of-kin of deceased subjects. The results will apply to the general population exposed to PCBs and to more than 100,000 women who are occupationally exposed to EtO in the United States. If positive, results will be used by OSHA and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to formulate guidelines for reducing exposures.

Project contact: Elizabeth Whelan
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1998–09/30/2008


Field Studies―Multiple Health Outcomes

Industry Health Surveillance with Group Medical Claims

Because a small fraction of occupational disease cases are reported in existing occupational surveillance systems, a great need exists for surveillance method development. This project will create a model for a new form of occupational health surveillance based on group medical insurance claims. Working with two major health insurers, claims data will be used to calculate disease rates by detailed industry for the following diseases: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumoconiosis, dermatitis, bladder cancer, carpal tunnel syndrome, low back pain, depression, parkinsonism, hearing loss, cardiovascular disease, and others. Results will be put to immediate practical use by the health insurers who will promote prevention of occupational disease with employers, using information about disease rates, medical costs of excess industry cases of disease, and recommendations for prevention developed by NIOSH. Results will also be used to determine the need for epidemiological studies.

Project contact: Tim Bushnell
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 01/01/2005–09/30/2007

Mortality of Independent Truck Drivers

The purpose of this study is to discover if independent truck drivers who are owner-operators have excess mortality when compared to the general population. Previous research has shown truck drivers to be at risk for lung cancer, heart disease, and obesity. Owner-operators may face even greater health risks than the general truck driver population because they have the added stress of running their own business, yet they are not currently included in national occupational illness and injury statistics. Data from the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association and the National Death Index will be linked, and statistics calculated to examine specific causes of death that are elevated among owner-operators. Results may help guide future research and prevention efforts. The project team will also help Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association to communicate study findings to drivers and to develop their ability to conduct on-going health surveillance for their members.

Project contact: Toni Alterman
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 03/01/2004–09/30/2008

Ag Health Study: Pesticide Exposure Among Farmer Applicators

The purpose of this project is to conduct pesticide exposure assessment research among farmers who are participating in the Agricultural Health Study, a collaborative research effort by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the EPA to investigate health risks among the farming population. The project will focus on characterizing the exposure of farmer applicators to selected pesticides (fungicides) and evaluating determinants of exposure. Agriculture and exposure assessment (NORA) are priority research areas within NIOSH, and epidemiologic evidence suggests that pesticides may be related to increased cancer risks among farmers. Obtaining exposure measurements on the Agricultural Health Study cohort should improve exposure classification strategies within the Agricultural Health Study.

Project contact: Cynthia Hines
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1099–09/30/2007

Flight Crew Studies

The purpose of this project is to evaluate the health effects of work as a flight crew member. Workplace exposures that may potentially contribute to adverse health outcomes include cosmic ionizing radiation and alterations of circadian rhythm. Several studies are underway to examine the risk of adverse reproductive health outcomes, cancer, and mortality. These studies will provide useful health information to the 198,000 flight crew members, frequent fliers, shift workers, and workers exposed to ionizing radiation.

Project contact: Barbara Grajewski
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period:10/01/1991–09/30/2007


Reproductive Research

Reproductive Toxicity of Occupational Chemicals

Occupational exposure to some chemicals may contribute to adverse reproductive outcomes. Using a pesticide, methoxychlor, and its reported active metabolite, these proposed studies will evaluate how methoxychlor inhibits testosterone production by rat testicular Leydig cells. In addition, the effects of methoxychlor on estrogen biosynthesis by granulosa cells of ovarian follicles and progesterone biosynthesis by corpora lutea will be studied. Exposure to environmental/occupational chemicals, such as those found in use in agriculture (also referred to as endocrine disruptors), may disrupt the normal reproductive effects regulated by these endogenous hormones. This project will elucidate the mechanisms of action of methoxychlor. This mechanistic information should assist hazard identification of workplace chemicals and be useful in control banding efforts.

Project contact: Eisuke Murono
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2003–19/30/2006

927001T—Health Effects Associated with Occupational Cycling

Health Effects Associated with Occupational Cycling, including male and female police officers is an ongoing project, initiated in response to health concerns over the relationship between bicycling and sexual dysfunction. Phase one evaluated tissue pressure on the load bearing regions of the urogenital triangle, feet, and hands and modeled biomechanical bodily stresses as a function of seat design and bicycle fit. Saddles without a protruding nose are being evaluated as an intervention to alleviate perineal parathesia and sexual dysfunction. In phase two, on-road cycling pressure on the urogenital triangle, hands, and feet will be measured with a data logger to verify the laboratory results of phase one. This project will inform bicycling police officers of the health risks from traditional bicycle saddles and provide a practical alternative.

Project contact: Steve Schrader
Division of Applied Research and Technology
(513) 533-8462
Project period: 10/1/2003–10/1/2007

92700A1—Reproductive Health Assessment of Male Workers

Reproductive Health Assessment of Male Workers is an ongoing project with the primary goal of assessing reproductive health hazards. Reproductive health hazards are evaluated using a male reproductive health profile consisting of different biomarkers for assessing male fecundity. For FY2006, work will primarily focus on the Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment project, which is a collaborative effort between NIOSH and the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The goal of the project is to study the semen quality of men. Other work includes development of new biomarkers to include in the male reproductive health profile.

Project contact: Steve Schrader
Division of Applied Research and Technology
(513) 533-8462
Project period: 10/1/2004–9/30/2009

Methods to Evaluate Reproductive Potential of Women

Methods to Evaluate Reproductive Potential of Women, an ongoing project, develops and applies methods to biologically monitor and assess the toxicity of workplace environments to populations of women exposed to chemicals, radiation, physical exertion, stress, and other forms of occupational hazards. Most chemicals identified as reproductive hazards have not been studied in humans, and given the prevalence of women in the today's workplace, a vast number are at risk from these exposures. Methods development will focus on specific and sensitive immunoassays to female reproductive hormones, or their biomarkers, in readily collectible body fluids, such as urine and saliva. Results from this research will help identify workplace hazards, isolate the hazards from potential victims, and reduce the social, economic, and personal cost imposed by reproductive disorders.

Project contact: James Kesner
Division of Applied Research and Technology
(513) 533-8462
Project period: 10/1/1999–9/30/2006

Risk for adverse reproductive outcomes among nurses

Female nurses may be at increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes through exposure to a variety of reproductive hazards. This project seeks to better understand the impact of chemical and physical exposures on reproductive health. The study population is the ongoing Harvard Nurses’ Health Study. In 2001, an occupational supplement was mailed to a subset of the Nurses’ Health Study-II cohort who had reported at least one recent pregnancy. Data from this supplement and from the prior Nurses’ Health Study-II surveys will be used for this project. The work will be conducted via a research contract with Harvard’s Nurses’ Health Study cohorts. Analysis began in FY2005 and results will be reported in scientific journals and nursing union newsletters. This study contributes to the NORA target areas of reproductive health and health care workers.

Project contact: Christina Lawson
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/2001–09/30/2006

Birth Defects and Parental Occupational Exposures

The purpose of this study is to provide detailed exposure assessment data for the National Birth Defects Prevention Study that will allow for examination of the link between occupational exposures and birth defects. The study is a collaboration between NIOSH, the CDC National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, and the eight State-based Centers that form the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Industrial hygiene expertise and published measurement data will be used to conduct exposure assessments for a variety of maternal occupational hazards based on information obtained from the mothers of cases and controls. Exposure data will then be used to examine potential risks of certain birth defects.

Project contact: Christina Lawson
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/2002–09/30/2006


Cardiovascular Disease Research

Analysis of Cardiovascular Effects of Stress in Police

Certain characteristics of the workplace such as shift work, long work hours, and high demands and low control have been associated with increased levels of stress and in some cases with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Because relatively few physiologic markers of stress have been identified and used in public health research, finding a valid marker of stress may enhance opportunities to detect associations with health outcomes. The objectives of this research are to develop and conduct optimal statistical and epidemiological analyses to examine the salivary cortisol response as a physiologic marker of stress and to determine whether this measure of stress is associated with adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences. The study will focus on subclinical or early markers of disease including blood pressure; laboratory measurement of lipids, glucose, and insulin; orthostatic hypotension and heart rate variability (autonomic nervous system function); ultrasound imaging studies to measure carotid artery wall thickness (atherosclerosis) and brachial artery reactivity (endothelial or vascular function); and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometric (DEXA) measurement of body fat, lean tissue composition, and bone density. Results from this study may increase understanding of how stress in the workplace might lead to adverse health outcomes and therefore lead to improved prevention efforts.

Project contact: Michael Andrew
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2004–9/30/2008

Fatigue in Buffalo Police Officers Study

NIOSH has entered into an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, to extend the currentBuffalo Cardio-metabolic Occupational Police Stressstudy by measuring police officer fatigue and the impact of fatigue on police officer health, performance, and safety.mSpecifically, this study will collect sleep quality data and police department information and records to (1) test the effects of shift work and extended work hours on police officer stress and fatigue and (2) examine the effects of stress and fatigue on subclinical cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease risk, psychological abnormalities, and police operational consequences. The results may increase the understanding of how these occupational risk factors may increase stress and associated adverse health consequences.

Project contact: Cecil Burchfiel
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2003–9/30/2008

Occupational Related Risk Factors and Cardiovascular Diseases

The purpose of this laboratory-based research project is to evaluate the effects of occupational exposure to ultrafine materials including various nanosize particulate matters on development of cardiopulmonary diseases. The tiny clumps of metals, ceramics, and organics may, similarly to environmental ultra-fine particles, provoke chronic inflammatory response in the lung, which facilitates their translocation to the circulation and vasculatures. These studies might uncover occupational related risk or modifying factors for atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular diseases, a major cause of death in the United States. The results of the project may point the need for targeted epidemiological studies of this problem. The findings of the project will help in establishing the scientific basis for safety regulations of the ultrafines and nanosized material exposures and for understanding how to improve worker’s cardiovascular health.

Project contact: Petia Simeonova
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 10/1/2004–9/30/2008

Role of CNTs in Cardiovascular and COPD-Related Diseases

Studies are being conducted in experimental models to determine whether carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles, like some other larger particulates found in the workplace, can influence pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Specifically the ability of CNT to influence lung inflammatory mediators, COPD and cardiovascular functions will be assessed in recently conventional and transgenic animal models. These studies will determine whether nanioparticles, and which types of nanoparticles, have the potential to influence lung diseases, including asthma, fibrosis, and COPD as well as coronary artery disease in exposed workers. Results from these studies should provide important information about hazard identification and dose-response that can be used in determining risk in the workplace.

Project contact: Mike Luster
Health Effects Laboratory Division
(304) 285-6121
Project period: 3/1/2004–9/30/2008

Work Organization, Cardiovascular Disease, and Depression

The purpose of this study is to increase available knowledge concerning the relationships between job stressors, cardiovascular disease, and depression.

Project contact: Travis Kubale
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 04/01/2001–05/19/2008

Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation Program Cardiovascular

The purpose of this project is to conduct individual investigations of fire fighters who died on-duty due to cardiovascular disease. The investigation characterizes the environmental, organizational, and personal circumstances of the death. Data from the investigation is used to generate (1) individual fatality reports and (2) a database used to develop hypothesis for prevention and intervention activities. The fatality reports are printed and disseminated to the fire service and are posted on the NIOSH Fire Fighter Web site. Findings have also been disseminated in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and at technical meetings and conferences.

Project contact: Thomas Hales
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 10/01/1997–09/30/2006

Occupational and Health Disparities

The purpose of this project is to provide an evidence-based review and critique of current practices concerning the role of occupation in population-based cardiovascular research. This project received intramural funding support for advancing research on the NORA Special Populations at Risk priority area. Data collection has been completed. The review of journal articles generated from the studies under review is on-going. Manuscript preparation has begun, and we anticipate presenting and publishing the results of this work in 2006. Knowledge produced from this project seeks to stimulate dialog among researchers and policy makers, and encourage the formation of funding opportunities by Federal stakeholders and other sources, to develop, promote, and implement conceptual and methodological advances in population-based health research regarding the role of occupation in health disparities for cardiovascular disease.

Project contact: Leslie MacDonald
Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluation and Field Studies
(513) 841-4428
Project period: 02/01/2004–02/01/2006

 

 
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  • Page last reviewed: May 23, 2011
  • Page last updated: May 19, 2009
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