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NIOSH and MSHA Investigation of CSE SR 100 Starter Oxygen Assembly

NOTE: This page is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated.

Updated April 26, 2012

NIOSH User Notice Concerning Loss of Start-Up Oxygen in CSE SR-100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuers (04/26/2012)
This User Notice describes the actions to be taken in the removal of CSE SR-100 SCSRs from use in mines and non-mining applications based on the findings contained in the NIOSH Technical Report, Loss of Start-Up Oxygen in CSE SR-100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuers [DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2012–139]. Continued use as a respirator in non-mining applications is contingent upon phase-out of the CSE SR-100s, and replacement of these respirators by a different NIOSH-approved respirator as described in OSHA ALERT OA-3541 [PDF 2.1 MB]. Continued use of these devices in underground mines is contingent upon implementation of the phase-out schedule for the devices described in MSHA Program Information Bulletin (PIB) No. 12-09. Earlier NIOSH user notices are listed below and MSHA user alerts can be found at: http://www.msha.gov/alerts/csesr100/csesr100alerts.asp.

Transmittal Letter to MSHA from Dr. Howard, Director, NIOSH [PDF 143 KB] (04/16/2012)
April 13, 2012, transmittal letter from Dr. John Howard, Director, NIOSH, delivering the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Technical Report, Loss of Start-Up Oxygen in CSE SR-100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuers [DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2012–139] to Mr. Joseph A. Main, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health (MSHA), U.S. Department of Labor.

Loss of Start-Up Oxygen in CSE SR-100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuers (04/16/2012)
DHHS (NIOSH) Publication 2012-139, April 2012
This report describes the results of an investigation carried out jointly by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) to assess the prevalence of a lack of sufficient start-up oxygen in CSE SR-100 self-contained self-rescuer (SCSR) devices. The investigation was designed to test field-deployed CSE SR-100 SCSRs to determine the extent of oxygen cylinder failures in the population of approximately 70,000 units deployed in underground coal mines. NIOSH and MSHA collected and tested the oxygen cylinders from 500 field-deployed units in order to determine if the defect rate among the deployed units was less than 1%. To have 95% confidence that the defect rate was less than 1%, no more than three units in the 500-unit sample could fail the test. Five units failed the test. Therefore, the 1% maximum allowable failure rate under the protocol was not met.

Update of the NIOSH and MSHA Collection and Testing of the CSE SR-100 (07/29/2011)
On October 4, 2010, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) started collecting CSE SR-100s in order to evaluate operation of the starter oxygen system. The agencies determined that a sample of 500 units from the deployed population would be needed to make a statistically sound evaluation of that population. On June 14, 2011, the sample collection and testing was completed.

Update of the NIOSH and MSHA Collection and Testing of the CSE SR-100 (05/17/2011)
On October 4, 2010, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) started collecting CSE SR-100s in order to evaluate operation of the starter oxygen system in each SR-100. The agencies need to collect 500 units to complete the evaluation. As of May 17, 2011, 269 SR-100s have been collected and evaluated.

Update of the NIOSH and MSHA Collection and Testing of the CSE SR-100 (02/15/2011)
Beginning on October 4, 2010, the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) began collecting SR-100s from a random list of serial numbers as prescribed in the sampling protocol. The agencies need to collect 500 units for evaluation and testing. For more detailed information see the December 30, 2010, update.

Update of the NIOSH and MSHA Collection and Testing of the CSE SR-100 (12/30/2010)
On December 7, 2009, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) opened the first of two investigations into the performance of the oxygen starter assembly on the CSE SR-100 self-contained self-rescuer (SCSR). During NIOSH tests, the oxygen startup cylinders in two SR-100 units failed to release a sufficient quantity of oxygen.

NIOSH User Notice Concerning CSE SR 100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuer (10/20/2010)
NIOSH, in conjunction with MSHA, has opened an investigation on the performance of the oxygen starter assembly on CSE Corporation’s SR 100 self-contained self-rescuer (SCSR). There is a problem with the functioning of some oxygen starter assemblies in the CSE SR 100 which is designed to furnish breathing air to miners in the case of a mine emergency.

NIOSH User Notice: SR 100 Sampling Plan (9/29/2010)
Beginning early October 2010, NIOSH and MSHA will begin collecting and testing 500 CSE SR100 one-hour Self-Container Self-Rescuer (SCSR ) units from underground coal mines. The purpose of this collection is to evaluate the actual prevalence of failed oxygen starters among field-deployed SR100s.

NIOSH Protocol for Sampling, Testing, and Analyzing O2 Starter Performance [PDF - 68 KB] (9/29/2010)
The purpose of this protocol is to establish procedures to sample, test, and analyze the CSE SR100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuer (SCSR) oxygen starter performance in mine-deployed respirators.

NIOSH User Notice: SR 100 SCSR Investigation (6/23/2010)
NIOSH and MSHA are currently investigating a self-reported failure of the oxygen starter in the one-hour SR 100 self-contained self-rescuer (SCSR, approved under TC-13F-0239, manufactured by the CSE corporation.

Background and Summary of NIOSH Investigation of CSE SR 100 Starter Oxygen Assembly (6/23/2010)
The NIOSH investigation into low startup oxygen levels in the CSE SR 100 was initiated as a result of observations made during the testing of several CSE units by the Long Term Field Evaluation Program. During testing, the oxygen startup cylinders in two SR 100 units failed to release a sufficient quantity of oxygen. As a result of this finding, NIOSH and MSHA opened an investigation concerning field-deployed SR-100s.

NIOSH Notice to Miners (3/4/2010)
A problem has been discovered with the CSE SR 100 self-contained self-rescuer (SCSR) in which some units may not provide sufficient oxygen when the starter oxygen cylinder is activated. It is important for all miners to know what to do if the oxygen on their SCSR, regardless of model, fails to activate.

NIOSH User Notice: CSE Corp SR 100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuer (SCSR) (2/26/2010)
NIOSH and the Mine Safety & Health Administration have opened a joint investigation concerning a problem that CSE Corp. has identified concerning its SR 100 Self-Contained Self-Rescuer.

 
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