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Occupational exposures associated with severe exacerbation of asthma.

Authors
Henneberger-PK; Liang-X; Lillienberg-L; Dahlman-Hoglund-A; Toren-K; Andersson-E
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 2015 Feb; 19(2):244-250
NIOSHTIC No.
20045558
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The exacerbation of asthma by workplace conditions is common, but little is known about which agents pose a risk. OBJECTIVE: We used data from an existing survey of adults with asthma to identify occupational exposures associated with severe exacerbation of asthma. DESIGN: Questionnaires were completed by 557 working adults with asthma. Severe exacerbation of asthma in the past 12 months was defined as asthma-related hospitalization, or reports of both unplanned asthma care and treatment with a short course of oral corticosteroids. Occupational exposures for the same time period were assessed using an asthma-specific job exposure matrix. We modeled severe exacerbation to yield prevalence ratios (PRs) for exposures while controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 164 participants (29%) were positive for severe exacerbation, and 227 (40.8%) were assessed as being exposed to asthma agents at work. Elevated PRs were observed for several specific agents, notably the irritant subcategories of environmental tobacco smoke (PR 1.84, 95%CI 1.34-2.51) among all participants, inorganic dusts (PR 2.53, 95%CI 1.37- 4.67) among men, and the low molecular weight subcategory of other highly reactive agents (PR 1.97, 95%CI 1.08-3.60) among women. CONCLUSION: Among working adults with asthma, severe exacerbation was associated with several occupational agents.
Keywords
Bronchial-asthma; Work-environment; Workers; Questionnaires; Humans; Men; Women; Exposure-levels; Risk-factors; Epidemiology; Statistical-analysis; Tobacco-smoke; Inorganic-compounds; Dusts; Author Keywords: work-exacerbated asthma; job-exposure matrix; occupational epidemiology
Contact
P K Henneberger, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1095 Willowdale Road, MS H2800, Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
IJTDFO
Publication Date
20150201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
pkhO@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2015
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1027-3719
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
State
WV
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