Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Investigation of exhaust conditions on influencing contaminant transport for indoor environments.

Authors
Zheng-ZC; Wei-Z; Bennett-JS
Source
ASME 2014 4th Joint US-European Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting, Collocated with the ASME 2014 12th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels, August 3-7, 2014, Chicago, Illinois. New York: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2014 Aug; 1A:FEDSM2014-22089
NIOSHTIC No.
20045550
Abstract
Indoor air quality is an important issue involved in a wide variety of industrial applications. In an indoor environment, different types of contaminants exist and have an inevitable potential to cause health problems for human beings and animals. In this study, the focus is on the contaminant contained in painting materials. While painting materials being sprayed to solid surfaces, pollutant plumes are formed near the painting area, which may enclose the body parts of the sprayers. Severe health problems are possible to occur if a significant amount of painting materials settles on the face of workers. By applying exhaust conditions (i.e. exhaust fan with outlet velocity), the flow convection in the room can be enhanced, which may alleviate the contaminant level on the human body. In such a case, the choice of exhaust condition becomes crucial. With the aid of computational fluid dynamics, an optimal exhaust condition can be determined. To simulate this kind of fluid/solid-particle multiphase flow, the current study employs a pure Eulerian or Euler-Euler type model. In the Euler-Euler approach, the properties of the contaminant particles are assumed to be continuous as those of fluids and all phases are computed in the Eulerian framework. Since the exhaust speed is moderately low and fully turbulent flow is not guaranteed in the room, the RNG k-e model is used as a low Reynolds number turbulent model. The current paper firstly investigated the scenario of sprayer self-contamination. Then, inter-contaminations among different workers will be studied.
Keywords
Air-quality; Environmental-factors; Air-contamination; Health-hazards; Humans; Men; Women; Children; Indoor-air-pollution; Animals; Painting; Paints; Paint-spraying; Environmental-exposure; Risk-factors; Ventilation; Ventilation-equipment; Exhaust-systems; Exhaust-ventilation; Fluids; Particulates; Models
Contact
James S. Bennett, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Applied Research and Technology, Cincinnati, OH 45226
Publication Date
20140803
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780791846216
NIOSH Division
DART
Source Name
ASME 2014 4th Joint US-European Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting, Collocated with the ASME 2014 12th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels, August 3-7, 2014
State
IL; KS; OH
TOP