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Sleep loss, circadian mismatch, and abnormalities in reorienting of attention in night workers with shift work disorder.

Authors
Gumenyuk-V; Howard-R; Roth-T; Korzyukov-O; Drake-CL
Source
Sleep 2014 Mar; 37(3):545-556
NIOSHTIC No.
20045325
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Permanent night-shift workers may develop shift-work disorder (SWD). In the current study, we evaluated neurophysiological and behavioral indices of distractibility across times prior to the night shift (T1), during night hours (T2), and after acute sleep deprivation (T3) in permanent hospital night workers with and without SWD. METHODS: Ten asymptomatic night workers (NW) and 18 NW with SWD participated in a 25-h sleep deprivation study. Circadian phase was evaluated by dim-light salivary melatonin onset (DLMO). Objective sleepiness was evaluated using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Electrophysiological distractibility was evaluated by brain event-related potentials (ERP), whereas behavioral distractibility was evaluated by performance on a visual task in an auditory-visual distraction paradigm. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Comparisons of ERP results were performed by repeated-measures analysis of variance, and t-tests were used where appropriate. A Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of variables (MLST, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and DLMO) that deviated from normal. RESULTS: First, in the SWD group, the reorienting negativity ERP amplitude was significantly attenuated compared to that in the NW group. Second, the SWD group had shorter MSLT during night shift hours (4.8 +/- 4.9 min) compared to that in NW (7.8 +/- 3.7 min; U = 47; z = -2.1; P < 0.03). Third, NW with SWD had a DLMO at 20:27 +/- 5.0 h, whereas healthy NW had a DLMO at 05:00 +/- 3.4 h (U = 43.5; z = -2.22, P < 0.03). Finally, acute sleep deprivation impaired behavioral performance and the P3a ERP in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate specific deficits in neurophysiological activity in the attentional domain among the shift-work disorder group relative to night workers.
Keywords
Sleep-deprivation; Sleep-disorders; Shift-work; Shift-workers; Work-intervals; Circadian-rhythms; Radiation; Radiation-effects; Humans; Men; Women; Physiology; Physiopathology; Brain-function; Neurophysiological-effects; Behavioral-testing; Health-care-personnel; Electrophysiological-effects; Brain-electrical-activity; Metabolism; Audio-visual-communication; Work-performance; Author Keywords: Shift work disorder; circadian phase; distractibility; ERPs
Contact
Valentina Gumenyuk, PhD, Sleep Disorders and Research Center, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI
CODEN
SLEED6
Publication Date
20140301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
vgumeny1@hfhs.org
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-009996; M112014
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0161-8105
Source Name
Sleep
State
MI; IL
Performing Organization
Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan
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