Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Associations of stressful life events and social strain with incident cardiovascular disease in the Women's Health Initiative.

Authors
Kershaw-KN; Brenes-GA; Charles-LE; Coday-M; Daviglus-ML; Denburg-NL; Kroenke-CH; Safford-MM; Savla-T; Tindle-HA; Tinker-LF; Van Horn-L
Source
J Am Heart Assoc 2014 Jun; 3(3):e000687
NIOSHTIC No.
20045302
Abstract
Background - Epidemiologic studies have yielded mixed findings on the association of psychosocial stressors with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. In this study, we examined associations of stressful life events (SLE) and social strain with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke (overall, and for hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes) independent of sociodemographic characteristics, and we evaluated whether these relationships were explained by traditional behavioral and biological risk factors. Methods and Results - Data from approximately 82,000 Women's Health Initiative Observational Study participants were used for the SLE and social strain analyses, respectively. Participants were followed for events for up to 18.0 years (median, 14.0). Separate Cox proportional hazards models were generated to estimate associations of each stress measure with incident CVD. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and depressive symptoms, higher SLE and social strain were associated with higher incident CHD and stroke (each P trend <0.05). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.12 (1.01, 1.25) for incident CHD and 1.14 (1.01, 1.28) for incident stroke among participants reporting high versus low SLE. Findings were similar for social strain. Associations were attenuated with further adjustment for mediating behavioral and biological risk factors. Findings were similar for associations of SLE with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke, but social strain was only associated with ischemic stroke. Conclusions - Higher SLE and social strain were associated with higher incident CVD independent of sociodemographic factors and depressive symptoms, but not behavioral and biological risk factors.
Keywords
Cardiovascular-system; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Stress; Epidemiology; Psychological-stress; Sociological-factors; Women; Risk-analysis; Behavior; Biological-factors; Heart; Demographic-characteristics; Mental-disorders; Mathematical-models; Author Keywords: cardiovascular diseases; epidemiology; stress
Contact
Kiarri Kershaw, PhD, MPH, Northwestern University, 680 N Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1400, Chicago, IL 60611
CODEN
JAHABZ
Publication Date
20140627
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
k-kershaw@northwestern.edu
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M112014
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
2047-9980
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Journal of the American Heart Association
State
IL; NC; WV; TN; IA; CA; AL; VA; PA; WA
TOP