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Safety climate, hardiness, and musculoskeletal complaints: a mediated moderation model.

Authors
Golubovich-J; Chang-C-H; Eatough-EM
Source
Appl Ergon 2014 May; 45(3):757-766
NIOSHTIC No.
20045291
Abstract
This study explores the mechanisms linking the psychosocial characteristics of the workplace with employees' work-related musculoskeletal complaints. Poor safety climate perceptions represent a stressor that may elicit frustration, and subsequently, increase employees' reports of musculoskeletal discomforts. Results from an employee sample supported that when employees' perceived safety was considered a priority, they experienced less frustration and reported fewer work-related upper body musculoskeletal symptoms. Psychological hardiness, a personality trait that is indicative of individuals' resilience and success in managing stressful circumstances, moderated these relationships. Interestingly, employees with high hardiness were more affected by poor safety climate.
Keywords
Workers; Work-environment; Work-areas; Musculoskeletal-system; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Models; Safety-climate; Employees; Employee-health; Employee-exposure; Psychological-factors; Psychological-effects; Sociological-factors; Stress; Author Keywords: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders; Safety climate; Psychological hardiness
Contact
Juliya Golubovich, Michigan State University, Department of Psychology, 316 Physics Road, Room 348, East Lansing, MI 48824
CODEN
AERGBW
Publication Date
20140501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
golubovi@msu.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008438; M102014
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0003-6870
Source Name
Applied Ergonomics
State
FL; MI; NY
Performing Organization
Sunshine Education and Research Center, University of South Florida
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