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Volitional weight-lifting in rats promotes adaptation via performance and muscle morphology prior to gains in muscle mass.

Authors
Rader-EP; Miller-GR; Chetlin-RD; Wirth-O; Baker-BA
Source
Environ Health Insights 2014 Oct; 8(Suppl 1):1-9
NIOSHTIC No.
20045192
Abstract
Investigation of volitional animal models of resistance training has been instrumental in our understanding of adaptive training. However, these studies have lacked reactive force measurements, a precise performance measure, and morphological analysis at a distinct phase of training - when initial strength gains precede muscle hypertrophy. Our aim was to expose rats to one month of training (70 or 700 g load) on a custom-designed weight-lifting apparatus for analysis of reactive forces and muscle morphology prior to muscle hypertrophy. Exclusively following 700 g load training, forces increased by 21% whereas muscle masses remained unaltered. For soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, 700 g load training increased muscle fiber number per unit area by -20% and decreased muscle fiber area by -20%. Additionally, number of muscle fibers per section increased by 18% for SOL muscles. These results establish that distinct morphological alterations accompany early strength gains in a volitional animal model of load-dependent adaptive resistance training.
Keywords
Animals; Models; Force; Training; Measurement-equipment; Muscles; Muscle-function; Morphology; Weight-factors; Muscles; Author Keywords: operant conditioning; resistance exercise; fiber cross-sectional area; fiber number; stereology
Contact
Erik P. Rader, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV, USA
CODEN
EHINA4
Publication Date
20141001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
WLZ4@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2015
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M102014
ISSN
1178-6302
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Environmental Health Insights
State
WV
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