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Gender differences in smoking among U.S. working adults.

Authors
Syamlal-G; Mazurek-JM; Dube-SR
Source
Am J Prev Med 2014 Oct; 47(4):467-475
NIOSHTIC No.
20045155
Abstract
Background: Cigarette smoking remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Although gender differences in cigarette smoking in the U.S. population have been documented, information on these differences among working adults is limited. Purpose: To describe the current smoking prevalence by gender among working U.S. adults and examine gender differences in smoking by occupation. Methods: The 2004-2011 National Health Interview Survey data for adults aged >/= 18 years that were working in the week prior to the interview (N=132,215) were analyzed in 2013. Current cigarette smokers were those who smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and currently smoke every day or some days. Results: During 2004-2011, an estimated 22.8% of men workers and 18.3% of women workers were current smokers. Of the current smokers, women workers had higher odds of being an everyday smoker (prevalence OR [POR]=1.17, 95% CI=1.09, 1.26); having poor self-rated emotional health (POR=1.28, 95% CI=1.15, 1.41); and having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (POR=2.45, 95% CI=2.14, 2.80), heart disease (POR=1.27, 95% CI=1.12, 1.45), and current asthma (POR=2.21, 95% CI=1.96, 2.49) compared with men workers. Women in "supervisors, construction, and extraction" (38.9%) occupations and men in "extraction" (40.5%) occupations had the highest smoking prevalence. Conclusion: Among working adults, women had lower prevalence of smoking than men, yet women who smoke were more likely than men to have adverse health outcomes, including self-rated poorer physical and emotional health.
Keywords
Workers; Occupations; Cigarette-smoking; Smoking; Tobacco; Tobacco-smoke; Men; Women; Sex-factors; Health-surveys; Statistical-analysis; Emotional-stress; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Heart; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Bronchial-asthma; Supervisory-personnel; Construction-workers; Physical-stress; Mental-health; Surveillance
Contact
Girija Syamlal, MBBS, MPH, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, 1095 Willowdale Road, Mail Stop HG 900.2, Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
AJPMEA
Publication Date
20141001
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
2015
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M102014
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0749-3797
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
State
WV; GA
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