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Using linked federal and state data to study the adequacy of workers' compensation benefits.

Authors
Seabury-SA; Scherer-E; O'Leary-P; Ozonoff-A; Boden-L
Source
Am J Ind Med 2014 Oct; 57(10):1165-1173
NIOSHTIC No.
20045049
Abstract
Background: We combined federal and state administrative data to study the long-term earnings losses associated with occupational injuries and assess the adequacy of workers' compensation benefits. Methods: We linked state data on workers' compensation claims from New Mexico for claimants injured from 1994 to 2000 to federal earnings records from 1987 to 2007. We estimated earnings losses up to 10 years after injury and computed the fraction of losses replaced by benefits. Results: Workers with lost-time injuries lost an average of 15% of their earnings over the 10 years after injury. On average, workers' compensation income benefits replaced 16% of these losses. Men and women had similar losses and replacement rates. Workers with minor injuries had lower losses but also had lower replacement rates. Conclusion: Earnings losses after an injury are highly persistent, even for comparatively minor injuries. Income benefits replace a smaller fraction of those losses than previously believed.
Keywords
Injuries; Work-environment; Work-areas; Workers; Humans; Men; Women; Disabled-workers; Author Keywords: workers' compensation; disability compensation; injured workers; earnings losses; injury cost
Contact
Ethan Scherer, MPP, Pardee RAND Graduate School, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
20141001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
escherer@prgs.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2015
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-009267; M092014
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
0271-3586
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
MA; CA; DC
Performing Organization
Boston University Medical Campus
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