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Occupational characteristics and the progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque over 9 years: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

Authors
Fujishiro-K; Diez Roux-AV; Landsbergis-P; Kaufman-JD; Korcarz-CE; Stein-JH
Source
Occup Environ Med 2015 Oct; 72(10):690-698
NIOSHTIC No.
20045030
Abstract
Objectives: The role of occupation in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a topic of research because few studies have examined longitudinal associations, and because occupation can be an indicator of socioeconomic position (SEP) and a proxy for hazard exposure. This study examines associations of occupational category as an SEP marker and selected occupational exposures with progression of the subclinical carotid artery disease. Methods: A community-based, multiethnic sample (n=3109, mean age=60.2) provided subclinical CVD measures at least twice at three data collection points (mean follow-up=9.4 years). After accounting for demographic characteristics, SEP, and traditional CVD risk factors, we modelled common carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque scores, and carotid plaque shadowing as a function of occupational category, physical hazard exposure, physical activity on the job, interpersonal stress, job control and job demands. These job characteristics were derived from the Occupational Resource Network (O*NET). Random coefficient models were used to account for repeated measures and time-varying covariates. Results: There were a few statistically significant associations at baseline. After all covariates were included in the model, men in management, office/sales, service and blue-collar jobs had 28-44% higher plaque scores than professionals at baseline (p=0.001). Physically hazardous jobs were positively associated with plaque scores among women (p=0.014). However, there were no significant longitudinal associations between any of the occupational characteristics and any of the subclinical CVD measures. Conclusions: There was little evidence that the occupational characteristics examined in this study accelerated the progression of subclinical CVD.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Cardiovascular-disease; Sociological-factors; Analytical-processes; Work-environment; Occupations; Job-stress; Racial-factors; Physical-fitness; Physiological-factors; Demographic-characteristics; Surveillance-programs; Long-term-study; Job-analysis; Analytical-models; Risk-factors; Management-personnel; Service-industries; Physical-stress
Contact
Dr. Kaori Fujishiro, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway (R-15), Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
20151001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
kfujishiro@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2016
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M092014
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
1351-0711
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Healthcare and Social Assistance
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
OH; PA; NY; WA; WI
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