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Talcosis and asbestosis in New York talc miners: dose response analysis of occupational exposure lung pathology and lung particulate burden.

Authors
Abraham-JL; Burnett-BR; Hunt-A
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis 1992 Apr; 145(4)(Pt 2)(Meeting Abstracts):A323
NIOSHTIC No.
20044922
Abstract
Pneumoconioses (talcosis, asbestosis, silicosis) and pleural plaques have long been associated with the large tremolitic talc deposit in upstate New York. We have recently studied autopsies (n=17) or biopsies (n=3) from men exposed from 0.4 to 39 yrs (from 1925-1990, most after 1950), including lung cancer (n=7) and mesothelioma cases (n=3). Fourteen were part of a NIOSH cohort [the source of cumulative exposure (EXP) data (in mppcf-yrs)], while 6 worked exclusively at mines not part of the cohort. Asbestosis (FIBR) was diagnosed and graded using standard criteria. Electron microprobe quantitative analysis (QA) of lung burden (LB) was done using in situ QA for non-fibrous (n=14) and digestion QA for fibrous (n=12) particles. Ranges (medians) include: age 39-76 (59); EXP 2.3-341 (48); LB 6.3x10(6) - 1.8x10(11) [2.6x10(8)] total fibers/g dry lung. Correlations with p<0.05 were observed between, e.g.,: EXP and LB of non-fibrous talc, fibrous (asbestiform) talc, FIBR; FIBR and fibrous talc. Within this sample of cases, there was no demonstrable qualitative or quantitative difference in the LB or pathology between cases from the cohort and others. Asbestiform talc and tremolite fibers form a major portion (mean=43%) of the LB; cleavage fragments are also present. These data support a dose-response relationship between EXP and LB of asbestiform, non-asbestiform particles and fibrosis, and between LB and fibrosis. Relationships between measured EXP, LB and FIBR were similar to those observed in other asbestos workers. Our data do not resolve the question of increased risk of lung cancer related to these exposures. Most cohort cases had mining exposures in addition to those estimated by NIOSH. This complexity may in part explain some of the contradictory epidemiologic analyses reported by others.
Keywords
Mining-industry; Miners; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Lung-disorders; Lung-burden; Lung-fibrosis; Asbestosis; Asbestos-fibers; Asbestos-dust; Talc; Talc-dust; Talcosis; Silicosis; Silica-dusts; Silicon-compounds; Autopsies; Postmortem-examination; Biopsy; Mesothelial-cells; Lung-cancer; Quantitative-analysis; Fibrous-bodies; Pathology; Dose-response; Exposure-assessment
Contact
SUNY Health Science Center, Syracuse, NY 13210
CODEN
ARDSBL
CAS No.
1332-21-4; 7631-86-9; 14808-60-7; 14567-73-8
Publication Date
19920401
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0003-0805
Source Name
American Review of Respiratory Disease
State
NY
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