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Prenatal exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and obesity at 9 years of age in the CHAMACOS study cohort.

Authors
Warner-M; Wesselink-A; Harley-KG; Bradman-A; Kogut-K; Eskenazi-B
Source
Am J Epidemiol 2014 Jun; 179(11):1312-1322
NIOSHTIC No.
20044733
Abstract
In-utero exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds, including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolite dichlorodiphenylethylene (DDE), has been hypothesized to increase the risk of obesity later in life. We examined the associations of maternal serum concentrations of DDT and DDE during pregnancy with body mass index, obesity, waist circumference, and percentage of body fat in 9-year-old children (n = 261) in the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) Study, a longitudinal birth cohort study in the Salinas Valley, California (2000-2010). We found associations between prenatal exposure to DDT and DDE and several measures of obesity at 9 years of age in boys but not in girls. For example, among boys, 10-fold increases in prenatal DDT and DDE concentrations were associated with increased odds of becoming overweight or obese (for o,p'-DDT, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0, 6.3; for p,p'-DDT, adjusted OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0, 4.5; and for p,p'-DDE, adjusted OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 0.94, 4.13). The odds ratios for girls were nonsignificant. Results were similar for body mass index z score, waist circumference z score, and odds of increased waist circumference but were less consistent for percentage of body fat. The difference by sex persisted after considering pubertal status. These results provide support for the chemical obesogen hypothesis.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Adolescents; Children; In-utero-exposure; Exposure-limits; Risk-factors; Chemical-composition; Drugs; Biomarkers; Blood-samples; Weight-factors; Toxic-effects; Monitors; Environmental-pollution; Monitoring-systems; Models; Pregnancy; Prenatal-exposure; Sex-factors
Contact
Dr. Marcella Warner, Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 265, Berkeley, CA 94720-7392
CODEN
AJEPAS
CAS No.
50-29-3; 72-55-9
Publication Date
20140601
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
mwarner@berkeley.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007400; M072014
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0002-9262
Source Name
American Journal of Epidemiology
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of California, Berkeley
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