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Humeral head translation after a suprascapular nerve block.

Authors
San Juan-JG; Kosek-P; Karduna-AR
Source
J Appl Biomech 2013 Aug; 29(4):371-379
NIOSHTIC No.
20044637
Abstract
Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common shoulder disorder. Abnormal superior translation of the humeral head is believed to be a major cause of this pathology. The first purpose of the study was to examine the effects of suprascapular nerve block on superior translation of the humeral head and scapular upward rotation during dynamic shoulder elevation. The secondary purpose was to assess muscle activation patterns during these motions. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the study. Using fluoroscopy and electromyography, humeral head translation and muscle activation were measured before and after a suprascapular nerve block. The humeral head was superiorly located at 60 degrees of humeral elevation, and the scapula was more upwardly rotated from 30 to 90 degrees of humeral elevation after the block. The differences were observed during midrange of motion. In addition, the deltoid muscle group demonstrated increased muscle activation after the nerve block. The study's results showed a compensatory increase in humeral head translation, scapular upward rotation, and deltoid muscle activation due to the nerve block. These outcomes suggest that increasing muscular strength and endurance of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles could prevent any increased superior humeral head translation. This may be beneficial in reducing shoulder impingement or rotator cuff tears over time.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Nerve-function; Nerves; Muscles; Physiology; Physiological-effects; Physiological-response; Models; Biological-effects; Motion-studies; Muscle-contraction; Musculoskeletal-system; Author Keywords: glenohumeral kinematics; rotator cuff; superior translation; electromyography
CODEN
JABOEG
Publication Date
20130801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
karduna@uoregon.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008288
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
1065-8483
Source Name
Journal of Applied Biomechanics
State
OR
Performing Organization
University of Oregon
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