Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Leptin, adiponectin, and heart rate variability among police officers.

Authors
Charles-L; Burchfiel-C; Sarkisian-K; Li-S; Gu-J; Fekedulegn-D; Violanti-J; Andrew-M
Source
Occup Environ Med 2014 Jun; 71(Suppl 1):A65-A66
NIOSHTIC No.
20044615
Abstract
Objectives: To investigate the relationship of leptin and adiponectin with heart rate variability (HRV). Method: Leptin and adiponectin levels were measured in 388 non-diabetic officers from the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress study, following a 12-hour fast. HRV was performed according to methods published by the Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and the North American Society of Pacing Electrophysiology for measurement and analysis of HRV. Mean values of high (HF) and low frequency (LF) HRV were compared across tertiles of leptin and adiponectin using ANOVA and ANCOVA; trends were assessed using linear regression models. Results: Leptin, but not adiponectin, was significantly and inversely associated with HF and LF HRV. BMI and percent body fat (also waist circumference and abdominal height) significantly modified the association between leptin and LF (but not HF) HRV. Among officers with BMI <25 kg/m2, the association between leptin and HRV was not significant. However, among officers with BMI .25 kg/m2, the association between leptin and HRV was inversely related, after adjustment for age, gender, and race/ethnicity; p-values for trend (HF HRV, p = 0.019 and LF HRV, p < 0.0001). Similarly, among officers with percent body fat .25.5%, leptin and LF HRV showed significant, inverse associations (adjusted p for trend = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results show that leptin levels were inversely and significantly associated with HRV among all officers, and particularly among officers with higher levels of adiposity. These results suggest that increased leptin levels may be associated with CVD-related health problems.
Keywords
Law-enforcement-workers; Police-officers; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Cardiovascular-disease; Cardiovascular-system; Heart; Heart-rate; Proteins; Hormones; Age-groups; Weight-factors; Body-weight; Humans; Men; Women; Workers; Work-environment; Epidemiology; Stress; Statistical-analysis; Age-groups; Racial-factors; Sociological-factors; Heart; Heart-rate; Cardiovascular-function; Cardiac-function
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
20140601
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M072014
ISSN
1351-0711
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Public Safety
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
WV; PA; NY
TOP