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Levels of ideal, intermediate and poor cardiovascular health by employment characteristics in 2005-06 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Authors
Hartley-T; Burchfiel-C; Gu-J; Andrew-M
Source
Occup Environ Med 2014 Jun; 71(Suppl 1):A67
NIOSHTIC No.
20044612
Abstract
Objectives: Employed persons are considered healthier than the general population. Yet, between 5-18% of all coronary heart disease deaths can be attributed to occupational exposures, ranging from noise to job stress. Cardiovascular health (CVH) is based on seven modifiable characteristics (i.e. cigarette smoking, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, diet, blood pressure, and levels of total cholesterol and fasting glucose) used to categorise individuals as having poor, intermediate and ideal CVH. In this study, we compared levels of CVH among employed and unemployed participants in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Method: The study population included 935 cardiovascular disease- free participants age 20 and older (731 employed, 204 unemployed). Employment status and work characteristics were derived from self-report questionnaires. Poor, intermediate and ideal levels of CVH and its components were defined using American Heart Association criteria. Weighted means and percentages were calculated using SUDAAN 10.0; models were adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity. Results: Mean number of ideal CVH components was significantly higher for employed compared to unemployed participants; 17.7% of those employed had ideal CVH compared to 12.2% of those unemployed. Ideal CVH was significantly lower for those in construction, manufacturing and transportation industries (8.6%) and in precision, product and transportation occupations (4.4%). Ideal CVH was significantly higher for afternoon shift (26.7%) compared to night/rotating (10.9%) and day (18.2%) shift workers. Conclusions: Understanding unique stressors and exposures for persons working in manufacturing, transportation and construction industries would be an important next step in designing interventions to improve their CVH.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Workers; Work-environment; Mortality-data; Morbidity-rates; Cardiovascular-function; Cardiovascular-system; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Smoking; Body-weight; Physical-fitness; Diet; Blood-pressure; Age-groups; Construction-workers; Transportation-workers
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
20140601
Document Type
Abstract
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M072014
ISSN
1351-0711
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
WV
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