Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

The influence of firefighting on pulmonary function: a longitudinal study of the first three years of duty.

Authors
Aldrich-T; Ye-F; Dinkels-M; Cosenza-K; Hall-CB; Cohen-HW; Webber-MP; Gustave-J; Weiden-MD; Kelly-KJ; Christodoulou-V; Prezant-DJ
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2011 May; 183(Meeting Abstracts):A4803
NIOSHTIC No.
20044514
Abstract
RATIONALE: Smoke inhalation has the potential to impair pulmonary function. After short-term exposure, the impairment is largely reversible, but few data are available regarding chronic effects. We explored pulmonary function changes over 3-4 years in a cohort of newly-hired firefighters and Emergency Medical Service (EMS) workers. METHODS: We examined spirometric data from approximately 6 months pre-hire and over the first 3-4 years post-hire, from all firefighters and EMS workers who had pre-employment spirometries between 1/2003 and 12/2006 and were subsequently hired by FDNY. None had World Trade Center exposure. EMS workers are not routinely exposed to smoke inhalation and served as controls. We focused our analysis on African-American and Caucasian (for whom prediction equations are reliable), male, never-smokers. We calculated percent predicted FEV1 (FEV1%), using NHANES equations. RESULTS: To date, 1,046 (83.0%) of firefighters and 145 (77.5%) of EMS workers who met our analytic criteria have had at least 3 acceptable post-hire spirometries. Baseline (pre-hire) FEV1% averaged higher for firefighters than EMS workers 98.9; (95% CI 98.3, 99.5) vs. 94.8; (93.0, 96.7) (p<0.01), reflecting more stringent fitness and pulmonary function job entry criteria. FEV1% declined by 0.68; (0.59, 0.78) percentage points/year over 3.89; (3.84, 3.94) years for firefighters and 0.81; (0.45, 1.17) percentage points/year over 3.17; (3.06, 3.27) years for EMS workers (p= 0.50) (see figure). The percentage of persons with FEV1
Keywords
Fire-fighters; Emergency-responders; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Lung-disorders; Pulmonary-function; Lung-function; Employee-exposure; Employee-health; Chronic-exposure; Pulmonary-function-tests; Spirometry; Preemployment-examinations; Smoke-inhalation; Humans; Men; Long-term-study; Vital-capacity
Contact
T. Aldrich, Yeshiva University, New York, NY
CODEN
AJCMED
Publication Date
20110501
Document Type
Abstract
Email Address
taldrich@montefiore.org
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement; Grant
Fiscal Year
2011
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U10-OH-008243; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U10-OH-008242; Grant-Number-R01-OH-007350
ISSN
1073-449X
Source Name
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
State
NY
Performing Organization
New York City Fire Department
TOP