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Police work absence: an analysis of police-specific stress.

Authors
Violanti-JM; Fekedulegn-D; Hartley-TA; Andrew-ME; Charles-LE; Burchfiel-CM
Source
Ann Behav Med 2014 Apr; 47(1)(Suppl):S47
NIOSHTIC No.
20044367
Abstract
Police work is a high stress occupation and stress has been implicated in work absence. The present study examined (1) associations between police stress and absences, (2) distinctions between "voluntary" (1-day) and "involuntary" (> 3-days) absences; (3) modifying effect of hardiness and coping. Officers (n = 337) from the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress study were included in the present study. The sample was 72% males, 77% Caucasian, 73%married, and 75%patrol officers. Mean age was 41 years (SD= 6.4). Measures included: the Spielberger Police Stress Scale, 1-year payroll absence data, the Dispositional Resilience Scale, and the Brief COPE. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate rate ratios (RR) of 1-day and >3-day work absences with increasing stress scores. Models were adjusted for age, race, rank, smoking status, and alcohol intake. For one-unit increase in stress scores, the covariate adjusted RRs for one-day work absences were: total stress score (RR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.04-1.36); administrative stress (RR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.05-2.18); physical/psychological stress (RR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14-2.07); lack of support (RR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.01-3.05). Among officers high in hardiness (above median score), the RRs were: total stress score (1.43, 95% CI: 1.15 - 1.80); administrative/professional stress (2.30, 95% CI: 1.23 - 4.31); physical/psychological stress (2.17, 95% CI: 1.35 - 3.47); lack of support stress score (4.00, 95% CI: 1.56 - 10.3). Results suggest that officers were more likely to take voluntary 1-day absences due to various types of stress at work. Stress was not significantly associated with .3 day physician documented absences suggesting they were due to illness. Hardy individuals including those with high scores on the challenge sub-score may use 1-day absences as a positive coping strategy.
Keywords
Police-officers; Law-enforcement-workers; Stress; Workers; Work-environment; Humans; Men; Women; Age-groups; Statistical-analysis; Models; Sociological-factors; Racial-factors; Smoking; Alcoholic-beverages; Coping-behavior; Emergency-responders
Contact
John M. Violanti, PhD, Social & Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of NY, Buffalo, NY, 14214
CODEN
ABMEEH
Publication Date
20140401
Document Type
Abstract
Email Address
violanti@buffalo.edu
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M052014
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0883-6612
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Public Safety
Source Name
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
State
WV; NY
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