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So how good are these smartphone sound measurement apps?

Authors
Kardous-CA; Shaw-PB
Source
Update: The Newsletter of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation 2014 Jan; 25(3):1,3
NIOSHTIC No.
20044305
Abstract
As of June 2013, smartphone penetration in the U.S. market has reached more than 60% of all mobile subscribers with more than 140 million devices. Apple iOS and Google Android platforms account for 93% of those devices [Nielsen, 2013]. Smartphone developers now offer many sound measurement applications (apps) using the devices' built-in microphone (or through an external microphone for more sophisticated applications). The ubiquity of smartphones and the adoption of smartphone sound measurement apps can have a tremendous and farreaching impact in this area as every smartphone can be potentially turned into dosimeter or sound level meter [Maisonneuve et al., 2010]. However, in order for smartphone apps to gain acceptance in the occupational environment, the apps must meet certain minimal criteria for functionality, accuracy, and relevancy to the users in general and the worker in particular. This study aims to assess the functionality and accuracy of smartphone sound measurement apps as an initial step in a broader effort to determine whether these apps can be relied on to conduct participatory noise monitoring studies in the workplace.
Keywords
Sound; Measurement-equipment; Equipment-design; Equipment-operators; Dosimetry; Noise-measurement; Workers; Work-environment; Monitoring-systems; Monitors
Publication Date
20140128
Document Type
Newsletter
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M052014
Issue of Publication
3
NIOSH Division
DART
Priority Area
Construction; Manufacturing
Source Name
Update: The Newsletter of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation
State
OH
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