Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Toolbox talk: lead exposure.

Authors
CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training
Source
Silver Spring, MD: CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, 2014 Mar; :1-2
NIOSHTIC No.
20044192
Abstract
Exposure to lead fumes and particles can come from many sources, including abrasive blasting, sanding, torch cutting, scraping, and loosening old paint with a propane torch. Dust and fumes can be inhaled, including by family members shaking out clothes. Lead can also get into the body by being transferred from dirty hands to food and drink. Serious damage can occur to your lungs, brain, liver and other organs. Children are particularly at risk for lead dust brought home from the job.
Keywords
Construction; Construction-industry; Construction-workers; Construction-equipment; Safety-education; Safety-programs; Injury-prevention; Accident-prevention; Work-environment; Worker-health; Training; Education; Safety-measures; Lead-compounds; Lead-dust; Lead-fumes; Families; Children; Abrasive-blasting; Paints; Biological-effects; Liver-function; Lung-function; Brain-function
Contact
CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, 8484 Georgia Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910
CAS No.
7439-92-1
Publication Date
20140313
Document Type
Other
Funding Type
Construction; Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-009762; M042014
Priority Area
Construction
Source Name
Toolbox talk: lead exposure
State
MD
Performing Organization
CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, Silver Spring, Maryland
TOP