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Gender differences in work-related asthma: surveillance data from California, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Jersey, 1993-2008.

Authors
White-GE; Seaman-C; Filios-MS; Mazurek-JM; Flattery-J; Harrison-RJ; Reilly-MJ; Rosenman-KD; Lumia-ME; Stephens-AC; Pechter-E; Fitzsimmons-K; Davis-LK
Source
J Asthma 2014 Sep; 51(7):691-702
NIOSHTIC No.
20044075
Abstract
Objective: To characterize work-related asthma by gender. Methods: We analyzed state-based sentinel surveillance data on confirmed work-related asthma cases collected from California, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Jersey during 1993-2008. We used Chi-square and Fisher's Exact Test statistics to compare select characteristics between females and males. Results: Of the 8239 confirmed work-related asthma cases, 60% were female. When compared to males with work-related asthma, females with work-related asthma were more likely to be identified through workers' compensation (14.8% versus 10.6%) and less likely to be identified through hospital data (14.2% versus 16.9%). Moreover, when compared to males, females were more likely to have work-aggravated asthma (24.4% versus 13.5%) and less likely to have new-onset asthma (48.0% versus 56.5%). Females were also more likely than males with work-related asthma to work in healthcare and social assistance (28.7% versus 5.2%), educational services (11.8% versus 4.2%), and retail trade (5.0% versus 3.9%) industries and in office and administrative support (20.0% versus 4.0%), healthcare practitioners and technical (13.4% versus 1.6%), and education training and library (6.2% versus 1.3%) occupations. Agent groups most frequently associated with work-related asthma were miscellaneous chemicals (20.3%), cleaning materials (15.3%), and indoor air pollutants (14.9%) in females and miscellaneous chemicals (15.7%), mineral and inorganic dusts (13.2%), and pyrolysis products (12.7%) in males. Conclusions: Among adults with work-related asthma, males and females differ in terms of workplace exposures, occupations, and industries. Physicians should consider these gender differences when diagnosing and treating asthma in working adults.
Keywords
Bronchial-asthma; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Pulmonary-function; Humans; Men; Women; Surveillance-programs; Statistical-analysis; Workers; Work-environment; Exposure-levels; Environmental-exposure; Sex-factors; Environmental-factors; Author Keywords: Gender differences; occupational asthma; reactive airways dysfunction syndrome; surveillance; work-related asthma; work-aggravated asthma
Contact
Gretchen E. White, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1095 Willowdale Rd., MS HG900, Morgantown, WV 26505
CODEN
JOUADU
Publication Date
20140901
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
GEWhite@cdc.gov
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-008468; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-008490; Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-008466; M042014
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0277-0903
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
Journal of Asthma
State
WV; CA; MI; NJ; MA
Performing Organization
Public Health Institute
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