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Understanding factors that influence protective glove use among automotive spray painters.

Authors
Ceballos-D; Reeb-Whitaker-C; Glazer-P; Murphy-Robinson-H; Yost-M
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg 2014 May; 11(5):306-313
NIOSHTIC No.
20044008
Abstract
Dermal contact with isocyanate-based coatings may lead to systemic respiratory sensitization. The most common isocyanates found in sprayed automotive coatings are monomeric and oligomeric 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). Most spray painters use thin (4-5 mil) latex gloves that are not effective at preventing dermal exposures when spraying isocyanate paints. Personal interviews with collision repair industry personnel and focus groups with spray painters were held to characterize risk awareness, to examine perceptions and challenges concerning protective glove use and selection, and to generate ideas for protective glove use interventions. The most popular gloves among spray painters were thin (4-5 mil) and thick (14 mil) latex. We found that medium to thick (6-8 mil) nitrile were not always perceived as comfortable and were expected to be more expensive than thin (4-5 mil) latex gloves. Of concern is the user's difficulty in distinguishing between nitrile and latex gloves; latex gloves are now sold in different colors including blue, which has traditionally been associated with nitrile gloves. Even though spray painters were familiar with the health hazards related to working with isocyanate paints, most were not always aware that dermal exposure to isocyanates could contribute to the development of occupational asthma. There is a need for more research to identify dermal materials that are protective against sprayed automotive coatings. Automotive spray painters and their employers need to be educated in the selection and use of protective gloves, specifically on attributes such as glove material, color, and thickness.
Keywords
Personal-protective-equipment; Gloves; Skin-protection; Skin-absorption; Skin-exposure; Protective-clothing; Paints; Paint-spraying; Painters; Spray-painting; Coatings; Isocyanates; Respiratory-hypersensitivity; Respiratory-irritants; Automobile-repair-shops; Monomers; Protective-materials; Repair-shops; Nitriles; Bronchial-asthma; Author Keywords: focus groups; interviews; automotive paints; spray painters; car painters; protective glove; nitrile; latex; butyl rubber
Contact
Diana Ceballos, NIOSH, 4676 Columbia Parkway, R-11, Cincinnati, OH 45226
CODEN
JOEHA2
CAS No.
822-06-0; 4098-71-9
Publication Date
20140501
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
DCeballos@cdc.gov
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-009364; M032014
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
1545-9624
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
WA; OH
Performing Organization
University of Washington
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