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Construction of early and midlife work trajectories in women and their association with birth weight.

Authors
Mutambudzi-M; Meyer-JD
Source
Am J Publ Health 2014 Feb; 104(S1):S58-S64
NIOSHTIC No.
20043936
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We derived trajectories of the substantive complexity (SC) of work across mid-adult life in women and determined their association with term birth weight. SC is a concept that encompasses decision latitude, active learning, and ability to use and expand one's abilities at work. METHODS: Using occupational data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and O*NET work variables, we used growth mixture modeling (GMM) to construct longitudinal trajectories of work SC from the ages of 18 to 34 years. The association between work trajectories and birth weight of infants born to study participants was modeled using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for education, income, and relevant covariates. RESULTS: GMM yielded a 5-class solution for work trajectories in women. Higher work trajectories were associated with higher term birth weight and were robust to the inclusion of both education and income. A work trajectory that showed a sharp rise after age 24 years was associated with marked improvement in birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal modeling of work characteristics might improve capacity to integrate occupation into a life-course model that examines antecedents and consequences for maternal and child health.
Keywords
Long-term-study; Lifespan; Women; Work-analysis; Work-capability; Education; Humans; Employees; Epidemiology; Age-factors; Age-groups; Adolescents; Weight-factors; Statistical-analysis; Occupations; Analytical-processes
Contact
John D. Meyer, MD, MPH, Associate Professor and Chair, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, SUNY-Downstate School of Public Health, 450 Clarkson Ave Box 43, Brooklyn, NY 11203
CODEN
AJHEAA
Publication Date
20140201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
john.meyer@downstate.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R03-OH-009666; M032014
ISSN
0090-0036
Source Name
American Journal of Public Health
State
MD; NY; CT
Performing Organization
University of Connecticut, Schools of Medicine, Internal Medicine/Medicine - Farmington
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