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Violence against teachers: etiology and consequences.

Authors
Gerberich-SG; Church-TR; McGovern-PM; Nachreiner-NM; Ryan-AD; Geisser-MS; Mongin-SJ; Watt-GD; Feda-D; Sage-SK; Pinder-E;
Source
Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, R01-OH-007816, 2008 Jul; :1-58
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20043814
Abstract
Within the realm of violence, work-related violence has been recognized as a major problem. While there is an emerging literature pertinent to work-related homicides, there is a serious deficiency in the knowledge of non-fatal work-related violence and the associated risk factors. During 2006 alone, 516 work-related homicides occurred, making homicide the fourth leading cause of occupational fatality overall (U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2007). While there is an emerging literature pertinent to work-related homicides, there is a serious deficiency in the knowledge of non-fatal work-related violence and the associated risk factors. According to Liberty Mutual (2007), in their annual 'Workplace Safety Index," work-related injuries due to "assaults and violent acts" are among the ten leading causes of nonfatal occupational injuries, based on interviews with 2200 executives responsible for workers' compensation and other commercial insurances at 125 mid-size firms and 75 large companies representing a range of geographic locations and industries. In 2004, these violent acts accounted for approximately one percent of all injuries on the job and cost approximately $500 million (Liberty Mutual, 2007). At the national level, a minimum of two million non-fatal work-related acts of violence have been estimated to occur each year (Duhart, 2001; Bureau of Labor Statistics, www.bls.gov; associated costs have been estimated at over four billion dollars, per year, particularly due to lost work time (Albrecht, 1997). However, the true prevalence of occupational violence is unknown.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Teaching; Education; Force; Injuries; Work-environment; Workers; Exposure-levels; Risk-factors; Environmental-exposure; Hazards; Behavior; Demographic-characteristics; Statistical-analysis; Safety-measures; Safety-programs
Contact
Susan G. Gerberich, University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, MMC 807, 420 Delaware Street S. E., Minneapolis, MN 55455
Publication Date
20080701
Document Type
Final Grant Report
Email Address
gerbe001@umn.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2008
NTIS Accession No.
PB2014-104065
NTIS Price
A05
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007816
NIOSH Division
OEP
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
MN
Performing Organization
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
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