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A chemical free, nanotechnology-based method for airborne bacterial inactivation using engineered water nanostructures.

Authors
Pyrgiotakis-G; McDevitt-J; Bordini-A; Diaz-E; Molina-R; Watson-C; Deloid-G; Leonard-S; Fix-N; Mizuyama-Y; Yamauchi-T; Brain-J; Demokritou-P
Source
Environ Sci Nano 2014 Feb; 1(1):15-26
NIOSHTIC No.
20043724
Abstract
Airborne pathogens are associated with the spread of infectious diseases and increased morbidity and mortality. Herein we present an emerging chemical free, nanotechnology-based method for airborne pathogen inactivation. This technique is based on transforming atmospheric water vapor into Engineered Water Nano-Structures (EWNS) via electrospray. The generated EWNS possess a unique set of physical, chemical, morphological and biological properties. Their average size is 25 nm and they contain reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. In addition, EWNS are highly electrically charged (10 electrons per particle on average). A link between their electric charge and the reduction of their evaporation rate was illustrated resulting in an extended lifetime (over an hour) at room conditions. Furthermore, it was clearly demonstrated that the EWNS have the ability to interact with and inactivate airborne bacteria. Finally, inhaled EWNS were found to have minimal toxicological effects, as illustrated in an acute in-vivo inhalation study using a mouse model. In conclusion, this novel, chemical free, nanotechnology-based method has the potential to be used in the battle against airborne infectious diseases.
Keywords
Nanotechnology; Airborne-particles; Pathogens; Vapors; Laboratory-techniques; Hydroxyl-groups; Oxides; Free-radicals; Oxidative-processes; Reaction-rates; Electrical-charge; Bacteria; Infection-control; Infectious-diseases; Inhalants; Inhalation-studies; In-vivo-study; Disease-control; Analytical-methods
Contact
Philip Demokritou, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA
Publication Date
20140201
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
pdemokri@hsph.harvard.edu
Fiscal Year
2014
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
M022014
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
2051-6347
NIOSH Division
HELD
Priority Area
Manufacturing
Source Name
Environmental Science: Nano
State
MA; WV
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