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Development of training modules for the NIOSH small business Train-the-Trainer program.

Zey-JN; Greife-A; George-D; Hayes-B; Colligan-M; Palassis-J
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, May 9-15, 1998, Atlanta, Georgia. Fairfax, VA: American Industrial Hygiene Association, 1998 May; :4
Fifty-two million people work in establishments with fewer than 100 employees. Thus, small businesses employ 56% of all workers in nonfarm private businesses. Small businesses are typically underserved in the areas of occupational safety and health. Small businesses are not regularly inspected and have minimal access to occupational safety and health information. To help fill the void in available information, NIOSH initiated an occupational safety and health training program for small business personnel in 1989. This involved offering short continuing education courses through local colleges tailored to the specific informational needs of regional small business managers. From 1989 through 1994, 15 one-day training programs were conducted. In 1995 the small business training program was modified to focus on minority small business personnel. NIOSH has collaborated with the Morehouse School of Medicine and the Minority Health Professions Foundation (MHPF) to provide occupational safety and health training to minority small business owners and managers. Lack of safety and health information among small businesses is typically due to limited training funds and a lack of knowledge about available resources. One component of the NIOSH program is the development of curriculum designed for independent trainers who present occupational safety and health training programs to small business owners through existing university outreach programs. Four modules have been developed via contract and four additional modules are under development. Safety and health professionals from NIOSH, representatives from OSHA small business training centers, and faculty from MHPF schools reviewed draft modules. Following review, NIOSH project officers and the contractor evaluated each reviewer's comments. The revised modules will be available via the NIOSH internet.
Small-businesses; Training; Education; Safety-education; Occupational-health-programs; Occupational-safety-programs; Racial-factors; Occupations; Hazards; Health-hazards; Occupational-hazards
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American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition, May 9-15, 1998, Atlanta, Georgia