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Prioritizing industries for occupational injury and illness prevention and research, Washington State workers' compensation claims data, 2002-2010.

Authors
Anderson-N; Bonauto-DK; Adams-D
Source
Olympia, WA: Department of Labor and Industries, 64-1-2013, 2013 Apr; :1-58
NIOSHTIC No.
20043649
Abstract
Background: Surveillance data that systematically evaluates occupational injury and illness by industry are relatively scarce, as are resources for prevention. Prioritizing industries for prevention efforts based on a high rate and high count of workers' compensation claims highlights where these injuries are occurring and where the most benefit of prevention efforts could be gained. This study examines which industry groups are at high risk for seven costly and common injury types and establishes a basis for efficient targeting of prevention resources. Methods: Washington State Fund (SF) compensable workers' compensation compensable claims from 2002-2010 were analyzed. Payroll hours were used to determine claims' incidence rates by industry group per 10,000 FTE. Claims were analyzed by seven aggregated injury types. We used a prevention index to rank the industry groups for each of the injury types, and to rank the industry groups within their NORA Sector. We also used the prevention index to rank Washington Department of Labor and Industries SF workers compensation risk classes. Industry groups were limited to those who had reported hours in 6 or more of the nine years of the study period, with .45 compensable WC claims over the period of the study and .100 FTE per year during the study period. Over the nine year period of the study there were 262 NAICS industry groups that met these criteria. Results: Between 2002-2010, there were 267,581 compensable Washington SF claims, accounting for over 11 billion dollars in direct workers' compensation costs. For 262 industry groups that met inclusion criteria, there were 267,420 compensable claims, and 53,075,809 days of time loss (TL). Seven common, high cost injury types were identified. "Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders" ("WMSDs"), "Fall from Elevation," "Fall on Same Level," "Struck By/Against," "Overexertion," "Caught In/Under/Between," and "Motor Vehicle" related claims. These seven injury types accounted for 87.8% of all compensable SF claims. The top ranked industries for each injury type, and in each NORA Sector were established by prevention index are presented. By prevention index, for "All Injury Types" combined, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 2381 Foundation, Structure and Building Exterior Contractors; 2361 Residential Building Construction; 2383 Building Finishing Contractors; 4841 General Freight Trucking, and; 2382 Building Equipment Contractors. Four of these top 5 were in the Construction Sector and 1 in the Transportation, Warehousing & Utilities Sector. These 4 Construction Industry Groups appear highly ranked across nearly every injury type (Building Equipment Contractors does not appear in the top 25 for "Fall on Same Level" nor in "Caught In/Under/Between"; and Residential Building Construction does not appear in the top 25 for "Motor Vehicle"). By prevention index, for "WMSD" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 2381 Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors; 2382 Building Equipment Contractors; 6231 Nursing Care Facilities; 2383 Building Finishing Contractors, and; 2361 Residential Building Construction. By prevention index, for "Struck By/Against" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 6232 Residential Mental Retardation, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Facilities; 2381 Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors; 2361 Residential Building Construction; 1133 Logging, and; 6243 Vocational Rehabilitation Services. By prevention index, for "Fall on Same Level" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 2381 Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors; 5617 Services to Buildings and Dwellings; 4841 General Freight Trucking; 6232 Residential Mental Retardation, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Facilities, and; 6231 Nursing Care Facilities. By prevention index, for "Fall from Elevation" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 2381 Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors; 2383 Building Finishing Contractors; 2361 Residential Building Construction; 1113 Fruit and Tree Nut Farming, and; 4841 General Freight Trucking. By prevention index, for "Overexertion" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 2381 Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors; 2361 Residential Building Construction; 2383 Building Finishing Contractors; 4841 General Freight Trucking, and; 4842 Specialized Freight Trucking. By prevention index, for "Caught In/Under/Between" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 3219 Other Wood Product Manufacturing; 1133 Logging; 3323 Architectural and Structural Metals Manufacturing; 3211 Sawmills and Wood Preservation, and; 2381 Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors. By prevention index, for "Motor Vehicle" injuries, the top 5 industries for research and prevention were: 4841 General Freight Trucking; 4842 Specialized Freight Trucking; 5617 Services to Buildings and Dwellings: 1133 Logging, and; 2389 Other Specialty Trade Contractors. Construction industry groups continue to be at high risk for occupational injuries. Non-construction industry groups, 1133 Logging (Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing Sector) and 4841 General Freight Trucking (Transportation, Warehousing & Utilities Sector), also appear highly ranked in each of the top seven injury types (as do other trucking industry groups). Conclusions: Efficient targeting of resources for prevention is necessary to make the most impact on the burden of occupational injury and illness, and ranking industries for prevention based on claim rate and count can help to prioritize resource allocation for maximum benefit. High risk industry groups identified by prevention index include those in the Construction Sector (NAICS 23), Residential Mental Health Facilities (6232), Nursing Care Facilities (6231), Logging (1133), Trucking industry groups (4841 and 4842), Waste Collection (5621), and Services to Buildings and Dwellings (5617). Using the injury type data and the PI rankings together provides information for effective targeting of prevention efforts and to help inform the setting of policy and research agendas in Washington State.
Keywords
Injury-prevention; Injuries; Statistical-analysis; Surveillance-programs
Contact
Naomi J. Anderson, MPH, Safety and Health Assessment and Research for Prevention (SHARP) Program Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, PO Box 44330, Olympia, WA 98504-4330
Publication Date
20130401
Document Type
Other
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-OH-008487
Priority Area
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing
SIC Code
NAICS-1113; NAICS-2361; NAICS-2381; NAICS-2382; NAICS-2383; NAICS-2389
Source Name
Prioritizing industries for occupational injury and illness prevention and research, Washington State workers' compensation claims data, 2002-2010.
State
WA
Performing Organization
Washington State Department of Labor and Industries
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