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Disturbance and recovery of trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours following repetitive lifting: influences of flexion angle and lift rate on creep-induced effects.

Authors
Toosizadeh-N; Bazrgari-B; Hendershot-B; Muslim-K; Nussbaum-MA; Madigan-ML
Source
Ergonomics 2013 Jun; 56(6):954-963
NIOSHTIC No.
20043632
Abstract
Repetitive lifting is associated with an increased risk of occupational low back disorders, yet potential adverse effects of such exposure on trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours were not well described. Here, 12 participants, gender balanced, completed 40 min of repetitive lifting in all combinations of three flexion angles (33, 66, and 100% of each participant's full flexion angle) and two lift rates (2 and 4 lifts/min). Trunk behaviours were obtained pre- and post-exposure and during recovery using sudden perturbations. Intrinsic trunk stiffness and reflexive responses were compromised after lifting exposures, with larger decreases in stiffness and reflexive force caused by larger flexion angles, which also delayed reflexive responses.Consistent effects of lift rate were not found. Except for reflex delay no measures returned to preexposure values after 20 min of recovery. Simultaneous changes in both trunk stiffness and neuromuscular behaviours may impose an increased risk of trunk instability and low back injury.
Keywords
Repetitive-work; Back-injuries; Musculoskeletal-system; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Exposure-levels; Risk-factors; Neuromuscular-system; Neuromuscular-system-disorders; Behavior; Humans; Men; Women; Injuries; Author Keywords: low back pain; lifting; trunk flexion; stiffness; reflex; biomechanics
CODEN
ERGOAX
Publication Date
20130601
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
nussbaum@vt.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-008504
Issue of Publication
6
ISSN
0014-0139
Source Name
Ergonomics
State
VA; KY
Performing Organization
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
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