Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Fatal work-related injuries among Brazilians in Massachusetts, 1999-2007.

Massachusetts Department of Public Health Occupational Health Surveillance Program
Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 2009 Jan; :1-5
This fact sheet summarizes information from Massachusetts on fatal work-related injuries among Brazilian-born workers. Little information has been publicly available about fatal injuries among this group of workers to date. In Massachusetts, as in the U.S. as a whole, Hispanic workers have been found to have high rates of fatal work-related injuries compared to non-Hispanic white workers.However, deaths of Brazilian born-workers may or may not be included in the Hispanic fatality count and are not generally reported separately. Brazilians are the most populous newcomer group in Massachusetts post - 1990. According to data from Northeastern University's Center for Labor Market Studies, from 2000 through 2003 Brazilians accounted for 19% of all new immigrants to the Commonwealth. Brazilians come to Massachusetts seeking work, but like many other immigrants, are more likely than native-born workers to be employed in dangerous jobs where hazards are inadequately controlled. Other factors are also believed to contribute to immigrants' risk of being hurt at work. These include inadequate safety training and supervision of workers, often compounded by language and literacy barriers, as well as immigrant workers' lack of information about safety and health standards and legal rights. Long work hours, job insecurity, and racial and ethnic discrimination in the workplace may also contribute to elevated risks of on-the job injuries, and the combination of several of these factors may make immigrant workers hesitant to speak up. From 1991, when the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Occupational Health Surveillance Program (OHSP) first began tracking fatal work-related injuries, through 1998, no deaths of Brazilian-born workers were recorded. In contrast, from 1999 through 2007, 15 Brazilian-born workers were fatally injured at work in Massachusetts.
Injuries; Injury-prevention; Surveillance-programs; Occupations; Information-systems; Mortality-data; Statistical-analysis; Humans; Workers; Work-environment; Traumatic-injuries; Health-protection; Training; Risk-factors; Hazards; Safety-education; Work-practices; Industrial-safety; Industrial-environment; Racial-factors; Mortality-rates
Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Occupational Health Surveillance Program, Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation Project, 250 Washington Street, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02108
Publication Date
Document Type
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Source Name
Fatal work-related injuries among Brazilians in Massachusetts, 1999-2007