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A cough aerosol simulator for the study of disease transmission by human cough-generated aerosols.

Authors
Lindsley-WG; Reynolds-JS; Szalajda-JV; Noti-JD; Beezhold-DH
Source
Aerosol Sci Tech 2013 Aug; 47(8):937-944
NIOSHTIC No.
20042709
Abstract
Aerosol particles expelled during human coughs are a potential pathway for infectious disease transmission. However, the importance of airborne transmission is unclear for many diseases. To better understand the role of cough aerosol particles in the spread of disease and the efficacy of different types of protective measures, we constructed a cough aerosol simulator that produces a humanlike cough in a controlled environment. The simulated cough has a 4.2 l volume and is based on coughs recorded from influenza patients. In one configuration, the simulator produces a cough aerosol containing particles from 0.1 to 100 um in diameter with a volume median diameter (VMD) of 8.5 um and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.9. In a second configuration, the cough aerosol has a size range of 0.1-30 um, a VMDof 3.4 um, and a GSD of 2.3. The total aerosol volume expelled during each cough is 68 ul. By generating a controlled and reproducible artificial cough, the simulator allows us to test different ventilation, disinfection, and personal protection scenarios. The system can be used with live pathogens, including influenza virus, which allows isolation precautions used in the healthcare field to be tested without risk of exposure for workers or patients. The information gained from tests with the simulator will help to better understand the transmission of infectious diseases, develop improved techniques for infection control, and improve safety for healthcare workers and patients.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Children; Aerosols; Aerosol-particles; Particulates; Airborne-particles; Diseases; Simulation-methods; Ventilation-systems; Personal-protection; Infection-control; Infectious-diseases; Safety-measures; Health-care; Disease-transmission
Contact
William G. Lindsley, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095Willowdale Road, M/S 4020, Morgantown, WV 26505-2845
CODEN
ASTYDQ
Publication Date
20130801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
wlindsley@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2013
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
B20130625
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0278-6826
NIOSH Division
HELD; NPPTL
Priority Area
Healthcare and Social Assistance; Public Safety
Source Name
Aerosol Science and Technology
State
WV; PA
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